Opinion

Solar power hit in the solar plexus

Workers installing a roof-top solar panel array. (Photo: lalanta71, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: On Jan. 1, California became the first state in the nation to require solar panels on all new homes up to three stories high. The unique mandate was approved last year by a state agency, the California Energy Commission. Meanwhile, just down the street in Sacramento, another state agency, the Department of Toxic Substances Control, is intent on designating the same solar panels that will be used to comply with the solar-power requirement as “hazardous waste.”

News

Stem cell agency OKs $5 million for COVID-19 research

Illustration: Aleksey Novikov, via Shutterstock),

California’s stem cell agency, in an emergency action, has allocated $5 million for research into treatments for Covid-19 and set the deadline for the first applications for one week from today. The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) approved the funding Friday during an emergency meeting of its governing board. 

Opinion

Crisis shows crucial role of online education

Photo illustration of successful online education. (Image: Pla2na, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: When public schools reopen and normalcy returns, California policymakers should take a hard, honest look at how online education can seamlessly transition students during times of crisis. Too many schools were unfortunately caught off guard — unprepared to serve students during the coronavirus outbreak. Currently, most of the state’s student population are in limbo receiving “busy work” and eagerly waiting to transition to a distance learning curriculum.

News

Coronavirus spurs anti-Asian sentiment

Residents of San Francisco's Chinatown take a stroll through their neighborhood. (Photo: photo-denver, via Shutterstock)

One of the least-talked-about symptoms of the COVID-19 pandemic is a rise in anti-Asian discrimination, harassment and violence. While there has been abundant anecdotal evidence of this phenomenon, only recently has anyone tried to quantify the bigotry. Two California-based groups and a professor from San Francisco State University are taking a lead on the issue.

Podcast

Capitol Weekly Podcast: KabaTalks and the coronavirus

Brian Kabateck, Kabateck Brown Kellner

Brothers  John and Brian Kabateck join us for another special KabaTalks episode of the Capitol Weekly Podcast. As usual, the brothers find themselves on opposite sides of a contentious issue – namely employer rights vs. workers’ rights in the age of coronavirus.

News

New push to expand ‘transitional kindergarten’ in California

A teacher and his students in a kindergarten class. (Photo: Monkey Business Images, via Shutterstock)

After a couple of failed attempts, a move to expand transitional kindergarten to all 4-year-olds in California is under way. Assembly members Kevin McCarty, Phil Ting and Eloise Gomez Reyes and state Sens. Susan Rubio, Lena Gonzalez, and Bill Dodd have introduced Assembly Bill 2500 to approve universal transitional kindergarten.

Opinion

A critical need to prohibit commercial evictions

Businesses in Cambria line a street usually bustling with customers, but now deserted due to the coronavirus (Photo; randy andy, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Under California’s police powers, Gov. Newsom’s gently named “Stay at Home” mandates the closure of all non-essential travel, activities and businesses. Small businesses have been inevitably forced to shutter their doors. Similarly, non-profits which account for 10% of the U.S. GDP and employ 12 million workers, are no doubt also affected.

News

Health officials to Newsom: Lockdown requires enforcement

The Santa Monica Pier, usually crowded, is closed due to the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo: BrittanyNY, via Shutterstock)

But one week into the lockdown, epidemiologists tracking rates of transmission in California and the United States worry that Newsom’s shelter-in-place order will be less effective in controlling new infections without stronger enforcement.

News

Coronavirus and California’s rape crisis centers

A woman wearing a surgical mask for protection against the coronavirus. Photo: Maridav, via Shutterstock)

When a person who has been sexually assaulted or is trying to escape a domestic violent situation comes to either of Community Solutions’ two offices, they will notice two things. First, the doors are open. Second, the waiting room has no chairs. As is the case with all of California’s 84 rape crisis centers, Community Solutions is continuing to provide services to clients in need during the COVID-19 crisis.

Opinion

Childcare in a locked-down world

Youngsters at play in a kindergarten.. Photo: Robert Kneschke, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: A recent television news headline asked, “Can day cares stay open amid coronavirus outbreak?” The answer has been confusing to many – school are closed, shouldn’t childcare centers be, too? Why are these groups of people okay but not others? What about the safety of the kids and staff?

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