News

California wants a hefty slice of that $2 trillion pie

A damaged highway in a rural area of California. (Photo: Tupungato, via Shutterstock)

What might President Biden’s colossal proposal to address the nation’s crumbling infrastructure mean to California? Admittedly, the $2 trillion fix is a long way from becoming reality. It’s still in the House, and Senate passage as the bill is written is a big “if.”

News

Price tag in Newsom recall battle starting to grow

Demonstrators in Huntington Beach protesting Gov. Newsom's closure orders in 2020. (Photo: mikeledray, via Shutterstock)

An effort to recall Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom has not even reached the ballot, but foes and backers of the governor already have raised or spent more than $7.5 million, with the likelihood of much, much more to come. The fundraising is a work in progress but all but certain to expand exponentially if, as expected, the effort makes the ballot and an election is held later this year.

News

CA bullet train hopeful over Biden’s infrastructure plan

An artist's rendering of California's bullet train. (Image: High-Speed Rail Authority)

State rail officials are taking the glass-half-full view. Rather than lamenting the fact High Speed Rail is absent from the president’s infrastructure plan, they’re pointing to supportive statements from Biden and his team, and insisting there’s time before Congress irons out a final deal to claim a share for California’s fast train.

Opinion

Proposed auto insurance rules would hurt poor, people of color

The Harbor Freeway at rush hour in Los Angeles. (Photo: Joseph Sohm, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: The California Department of Insurance, having identified a disparity, has established a worthy goal of expanding auto insurance discounts to more low-income consumers and communities of color. But as it pursues that goal, the department must keep in mind a foundational principle in healing problems: Do no harm.

Podcast

Capitol Weekly Podcast: LA County Supervisor Holly Mitchell

Former state Sen. Holly J. Mitchell was elected last year to a seat on the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, representing District 2 – the same district in which she was born and raised. Term limits have turned the traditional local government-to-Legislature pipeline on its head, as has the stratospheric growth of LA: As a supervisor in a county of 10 million people, Mitchell represents twice as many constituents as she once did in the state Senate.

News

Legacy of a young woman’s murder: Will the counties step up?

Sacramento County Supervisor Sue Cross at a meeting of the board. (Photo: Screen capture, CBS13, Sacramento)

 Sue Frost, chair of the Sacramento County Board of Supervisors, did not originally support a 2002 state law that provides family members with one of the few legal avenues to get severely mentally ill relatives into intensive treatment. Like other public officials, she was concerned about patient rights and cost.

Letters

Letter to the Editor: Mental health care

Dear Editor: I want to commend reporter Sigrid Bathen for her thorough and excellent reporting on an issue important to so many people: providing mental health care for our loved ones. Ms. Bathen’s two-part series shined a critical light on some counties’ resistance to adopting Laura’s Law to enhance outpatient services to those with severe mental health issues.

News

For the mentally ill, a life-and-death debate over Laura’s Law

Amanda and Nick Wilcox were honored in the state Assembly for their efforts to establish "Laura's Law," named after their 19-year-old daughter who was slain by a mentally ill gunman two decades ago. (Photo: Elias Funez, The Union, Nevada County.)

When Kaino Hopper’s 31-year-old daughter adamantly refused – as she often has — the mental health treatment she so desperately needs, it was a rainy, blustery January day in Sacramento, and she was homeless, sleeping in fields and suburban parks. Her mother had few choices, and contacted her daughter’s caseworker for help.

Opinion

State must keep Medi-Cal funding for phone appointments

A physician uses his cell phone for a medical discussion. (Photo: apr.org)

OPINION: The mother on the other end of the phone call was worried about her newborn’s increased fussiness and stomach issues.  After taking a thorough history, the problem became clear: The mother had switched from breastmilk to a formula that triggered symptoms related to the baby’s known history of milk protein allergy. I advised a switch to a hydrolyzed formula.

Podcast

Capitol Weekly Podcast: Jeff Kightlinger

Regional Recycled Water Advanced Purification Center Grand Opening 10, Oct 2019

In this episode John Howard and Tim Foster welcomed the longtime but soon-to-be-retired Metropolitan Water District of Southern California head honcho Jeff Kightlinger for a wide-ranging discussion that covered the status of the Delta Tunnel Project, climate change and the snow survey, the drought, working from home, jukeboxes and his punk rock roots.

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