CA120: Despite missteps, Trump’s backers stay faithful

GOP presidential contender Donald Trump at a rally in Boca Raton, Florida. ((Photo: Windover Way Photography)

We found that no matter what Trump has said – be it the sexually explicit and aggressive comments released before the second debate, or his statement in Wednesday’s third and final debate that he would not commit to accepting the result of the election – his support here in California has remained very consistent.


‘Special master’ appointed to eye State Bar

An attorney gives advice to a client via a cell phone. Photo: PhuShutter)

A special master has been named to examine the State Bar’s request for money – a move that follows the Legislature’s unprecedented refusal to allow the bar to collect dues from thousands of attorneys. State Supreme Court Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye on Wednesday appointed appellate court Justice Elwood Lui of Los Angeles to examine the Bar’s funding request.


Drug industry clout, Medicare costs

Prescription drugs displayed across a counter top. (Photo: Motorolka, via Shutterstock)

FairWarning: When the Republican-controlled Congress approved a landmark program in 2003 to help seniors buy prescription drugs, it slapped on an unusual restriction: The federal government was barred from negotiating cheaper prices for those medicines. Instead, the job of holding down costs was outsourced to the insurance companies delivering the subsidized new coverage, known as Medicare Part D.


CA120: Myth of the ‘independents’

A voters hows his badge of independence. (Photo: Joe Belanger, via Shutterstock)

Donald Trump is not just the Republican presidential nominee in California. If you got your ballot in the mail, you might have noticed one little oddity: Under Donald Trump’s name you’ll find not only his Republican Party, but also the little known American Independent Party (AIP).


Capitol Weekly Podcast: Buffy Wicks

Hillary and Buffy

With the election just four weeks away, Capitol Weekly’s John Howard and Tim Foster sat down with Buffy Wicks, Democratic strategist and California State Director for Hillary Clinton’s 2016 primary campaign.


Veteran California pollster heads online

Image by Tim Foster, Capitol Weekly

One of the state’s most respected polls has begun incorporating online surveys for the first time, underscoring the increasing difficulty of relying on telephone questioning. The Field Poll, which was founded in 1947, started using online surveys to gather voter opinion on nine of the 17 statewide ballot propositions that will appear on the Nov. 8 ballot.


Potent brew: Hollywood and political cash

Hollywood Boulevard at dusk. (Photo: Sean Pavone, via Shutterstock)

Hollywood and Sacramento are not cities that normally leap into our thoughts at the same time. Sacramento is leafy streets and politics and scorching heat. Hollywood is, well, Hollywood.


Ballot admission price: $48 million

A California ballot box. (Photo illustration, Hafakot, via Shutterstock)

It’s like a poker game: If you want to play, you have to ante up. And this year, the ante for Nov. 8 was nearly $48 million. That’s how much the rival interests for an array of initiatives paid to get on the ballot. That’s not money spent on the merits of the initiatives. It’s the money spent simply to get the propositions before the public.


Death toll up for bicyclists, walkers

Bicyclists navigating the streets of San Francisco. (Photo: Can Balcioglu)

FairWarning: More Americans are bicycling or walking to work these days, but with little government investment in safety measures, such as protected bike lanes and sidewalks, more cyclists and pedestrians are getting killed. In San Francisco, the hit-and-run deaths of two female bicyclists in a single day in late June spurred community outrage and a plan to add 15 miles of protected bikeways, more than doubling the city’s current total.


Vaccinations: Progress, but more work needed

A vaccination in progress. (Photo: Komsan Loonprom)

OPINION: The immunization rate for incoming kindergarten students has jumped this year by more than 2 percentage points—to approximately 93 percent. This is news we should all be proud of. But anyone who cares about the health of our state and the welfare of our communities should not rest on the success of SB 277 – there is still more work to be done.

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