News

PolitiFact California: Targeting Trump’s voter count

Republican presidential contender Donald Trump at a campaign event. (Photo: Joseph Sohm)

“In the history of Republican primaries, I’ve gotten the most votes in the history of the Republican party,” Trump said during his speech on Friday, April 29, at the California Republican Party Convention south of San Francisco. Trump went on to say he’s broken the record without needing to wait for big states like California. Was Trump right? We set out on a fact check.

News

Young Republicans as divided as their elders

A group of young Republicans meet at the state GOP convention.Photo: Serla Rusli)

There are divisions within the California Republican Party, and nowhere are they more apparent than among the party’s youngest members. Capitol Weekly spoke to young Republicans on the state GOP convention last weekend in Burlingame. Groups from the Bay Area and Southern California were represented, as well as young Republicans working on campaigns.

News

Veterans Treatment Courts play crucial role

They’re called Veterans Treatment Courts, a little-known part of the judicial system that deals specifically with military veterans crippled by stress, drugs and the memories of war. The specialized courts can be found around the country. But only 12 of California’s 58 counties have this service for veterans.

Analysis

Poll: Bernie up with independents, but Hillary still holds sway

California supporters of Bernie Sanders attend a rally. (Photo: Joseph Sohm)

CA120: Sanders has been stronger in states like California with “open” primaries — those that allow non-Democrats voters to cast a ballot. California Democrats allow voters not registered with any other political party to vote in their primary. But the question is this: In what numbers will these non-partisans vote? Can Sanders surf this wave of support to a victory in California? The answer, according to our data, is probably not.

Opinion

Making the case for fracking

Oil rigs in a Kern County oil field. (Photo: Christopher Halloran)

OPINION: What do comedian Stephen Colbert, the Washington Post editorial board and Gov. Jerry Brown have in common? They recognize the necessity of hydraulic fracturing. In an interview on The Late Show with Colbert last November to promote his award-winning movie, Spotlight, actor and anti-fracking activist Mark Ruffalo scoffed, “What the hell. Who thought of fracking?” Without missing a beat, Colbert replied, “People who need oil. They’re called Americans.”

News

Political buttons: Snarky, terse, fun

A vendor hawking buttons, stickers at the Callfornia Republican Party convention. (Photo: Serla Rusli)

Judy DeVries was in her car when she heard the surprise news that Ted Cruz had selected Carly Fiorina as his running mate. She knew immediately what she had to do. “We’re like ‘Oh my goodness, we have a VP,” she said. “We need to make buttons!”

News

Reporter’s Notebook: A day with the GOP

Republican presidential contender Ted Cruz at the California GOP convention. (Photo: Jeff Chiu/Associated Press)

At the top of the glistening white staircase leading to the hotel mezzanine, the amiable, white-haired activist was handing out “Cruz for President” stickers. “I’ve been scoffed at and scorned,” he said. “It was fun.”

News

PolitiFact California: Trump and the truth

Republican presidential contender Donald Trump at an event in Nevada. (Photo: Joseph Sohm, via Shutterstock)

Donald Trump brings his brash and boisterous Republican campaign for president to the Golden State this week. The New York billionaire and GOP frontrunner is Friday’s keynote speaker at the California Republican Party Convention south of San Francisco. When Trump arrives, he’ll bring his well-documented and checkered relationship with the truth.

News

Delegates: The quiet election

An election-season shirt and tag. (Photo: IQConcept,via Shutterstock)

It’s the most important election you’ve never heard of: On Sunday, thousands of Democrats across California will go to scattered voting places – libraries, community centers, meeting halls – to choose presidential delegates for the national convention this summer in Philadelphia.

Opinion

Joining hands on climate change: Brazil, California

In the Amazon rain forest of Acre, Brazil. (Photo: Andre Dib, Shutterstock)

OPINION: Protecting our climate is very important to the indigenous people of the Amazon. In the Brazilian state of Acre, where I live, we’re already seeing terrible heat, floods and droughts that we never used to experience. That’s why cooperation with California to protect our forests is important to people here.

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