News

California’s ‘four-party’ system

Participants at a May 2016 rally for Donald Trump in Anaheim. (Photo: mikeledray, via Shutterstock)

For more than 165 years, political battles in California have played out almost entirely within the framework of a two-party system. There are signs that may be changing. Differing ideologies within each party are competing for money, supporters and attention.  Out of it all, four major, distinct political tribes seem to be emerging.

News

Targeting the closure of nonprofit hospitals

Alta Bates Summit Medical Center. (Photo: Wikipedia)

East Bay lawmakers are pushing a bill to stop Sutter Health from shuttering its Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Berkeley — a measure with major statewide implications. The bill was prompted by issues surrounding Alta Bates, but it would apply to any emergency rooms across California run by nonprofits.

News

Lease-a-dog? You’re kidding, right?

Bubba, a dog who found an owner after a year in a shelter. (Photo: Photography by Adri, via Shutterstock)

Should customers be able to lease dogs and cats in the same way they rent cars, apartments or furniture? California legislators think not. Both houses overwhelmingly approved Assembly Bill 1491, which would outlaw the practice beginning Jan. 1. The bill is now awaiting final action from Gov. Jerry Brown.

Opinion

Affordable, reliable water for California

Water is pumped into an irrigation canal. (Photo: Straight 8 Photography)

OPINION: On the heels of a record-breaking drought and phenomenal water savings by California residents, Gov. Jerry Brown called upon the state to make conservation a permanent way of life.  The administration established a broad stakeholder group comprised of water agencies, business and community groups and environmental organizations to develop a fair, forward looking conservation framework for the state.

News

CA120: An odd tale of prisoners and redistricting

General population prisoners at San Quentin march in a line. (Photo: Eric Risberg/Associated Press)>

Much of redistricting law is arcane and technical. But often what seems like a little detail can become a significant factor in how the lines will be drawn. Take, for example, prisoners. The U.S. Census counts prisoners just like any other part of the overall population. The Census captures people at their “usual residence,” meaning the place where they live and sleep most days.

Opinion

Clean energy crucial for California

Windmills at sunset in the California desert. (Photo: Angie Agostino)

OPINION: Look around lately and it’s hard to ignore evidence of chaos fueled by our changing climate. From the barrage of hurricanes in the Atlantic to the raging wildfires and heat waves throughout the West, climate change is here already and it refuses to be ignored. In the last week, everyone from Miami’s Republican mayor to Pope Francis has affirmed the need for swift action.

News

Water: Setting the sights on Sites

An artist's rendering of the proposed Sites Reservoir complex. (Image: California Department of Water Resources)

Sites Reservoir has been talked about for decades, but now that project officials — and backed by 70 major allies — have formally submitted an application for state bond money, the question arises: Will this $5 billion project actually come to pass? The proposed surface reservoir would be located in Colusa County, but is competing with 11 other applicants for part of a $2.7 billion coffer of state money devoted to water storage projects.

Experts Expound

Experts Expound: Universal health care

Everybody’s talking about it, so we though we’d ask our experts: “Universal health care: Do we want it, will we get it? If so, when?” Here’s what they told us.

Opinion

Balancing regulation with innovation

OPINION: As the Legislature hurries to complete its final month of work for the year, the Capitol is humming with activity as legislators present and vote on hundreds of bills, advancing them to the governor’s desk. In the case of each bill, the Legislature’s responsibility is the same: To carefully consider its policy merits and its long-term impacts on regular Californians, our economy and our state’s future.

News

Guide to the cover of the 2017 Top 100

Just who ARE all those people on the cover of this year’s Top 100? Inspired by The Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s album cover, Capitol Weekly staff collected a myriad group of political figures and otherwise notable Californians. Below is a numbered “Who’s Who.”

1. Culbert Olson, Governor of California 2. Anthony Kennedy, Justice, Supreme Court of

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