News

Lobbying bills on the floors of the Legislature

The chamber of the state Senate in Sacramento. (Photo: Felix Lipov, via Shutterstock)

In simplistic terms, lobbying the state Senate and Assembly floors is similar to lobbying legislative committees, except that the scale is much larger. For example, some committees have as few five members (elected officials), while others have over 20 members. As you would assume, most committees in the 40-member Senate have fewer members sitting on them than do their counterparts in the 80-member Assembly.

Podcast

Capitol Weekly Podcast: A Post-Mortem of the 2020 Election

Last week Capitol Weekly and the McGeorge Capital Center for Law & Policy presented a Post-Mortem of the 2020 Election, a half-day online conference in which a score of experts and insiders discussed the results of the election and provided a look-ahead at what they mean for 2021 – and beyond. This event was held on Thursday, November 5. We broadcast audio from each of the presentations as individual episodes of the Capitol Weekly Podcast.

News

Santa Clara judge creates ‘gold standard’ for mental health courts

Judge Stephen V. Manley on the bench in Santa Clara County. (Photo: Veteransvoices.net)

Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge Stephen Manley refers to defendants in his courtroom as “clients” – an indication of the unusually informal and conversational tenor of the Behavioral Health Court he created more than two decades ago. “It tends to break through a barrier,” Manley said.

News

A primer for lobbying bills in legislative committees

The state Capitol in Sacramento. (Photo: Always Wanderlust, via Shutterstock)

When preparing to lobby legislative committees, the focus is on legislative staff and then legislators. There are two types of staff for our purposes: committee and member. Committee staff, referred to as committee consultants, are those who work directly for the legislative policy or fiscal committees. Member staff are those who work directly for an Assembly member or senator.

News

Voters favor $5.5 billion more for state stem cell research

A scientist at work in a biological lab. (Photo: anyaivanova)

California voters have apparently approved spending $5.5 billion more on stem cell research over the next 10 to 15 years and significantly broadening the scope of its state stem cell agency, according to unofficial figures this morning. 

News

CA120: The early vote and the roller coaster of Election Day

An image of California voting materials. (Photo: Jason Raff, via Shutterstock)

As has been reported in Capitol Weekly, the early vote has been dominated by Democratic voters. This is in direct contrast to every other election in California history in which Republicans have over-performed in the early returns, leaving Democrats to play catch-up in the late mail and Election Day vote.

Opinion

Racial justice: The critical piece of this election

Latinos taking the pledge of allegiance in Los Angeles. (Photo: Joseph Sohm, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: 2020 has been anything but typical, and for Black communities and communities of color, this year has been especially tough. Yet, we remain hopeful and determined because this election is a golden opportunity to create a Golden State for all of us. With our collective efforts, 2020 could be the year where an electorate that reflects the diversity of our state shows up to be heard and counted.

News

Nov. 3: Voting on the right to vote

A diverse group of voters casting their ballots. (Photo: SeventyFour, via Shutterstock)

A pair of Nov. 3 ballot measures seeks to confer voting rights on two wildly disparate groups of Californians — prisoners and teenagers. Prop. 17 would amend the state constitution to restore voting rights to prison inmates who have completed their sentences. Prop. 18, another constitutional amendment, would allow 17-year-olds to vote in primary and special elections if they become 18 by the next general election.

Podcast

Capitol Weekly Podcast: David Cruz says “Yes” on 22

David Cruz is the head of the Economic and Business Council for the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC). LULAC has declined to take a position on California’s hotly-contested Proposition 22, but Cruz has been actively engaged in making the case to pass the measure, including an appearance in an October debate against Latina activist Dolores Huerta, who is in opposition. David joined us by phone to discuss his support for Prop. 22, including a novel take on how to view the nearly quarter-billion dollars spent on the campaign.

Opinion

Fight climate change, preserve nature in one stroke

The forest and fog of Humboldt County. (Photo: Ethan Daniels, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: This week, Governor Newsom announced a first-in-the-nation pledge to protect 30% of the state’s land and water by 2030. This historic executive order will require significant conservation action from our leaders. Thankfully, numerous Members of Congress are currently working to pass legislation to protect critical public lands and waters across the state which would help California meet our new “30×30” target.

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