Opinion

Privacy agency taking shape, but much work remains

An illustration of California's new privacy laws and online security. (Photo: Cristian Storto, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Following the passage of Proposition 24 by a considerable margin, the new California Privacy Protection Agency Board members were finally appointed. The Assembly speaker, the Senate leader, the state attorney general, and the governor all choose a venerable group of five privacy minds to help shape and lead the new agency as it prepares for the law’s effective date of 2023.

Analysis

In California, could 2021 be propane’s year?

Industrial propane tanks. (Photo: RazorbackAlum, via Shutterstock)

ANALYSIS: Among the numerous advocates for a wider range of lower-carbon options in the U.S. is one group who’ve not received much attention: the propane industry. Given the trends on propane usage and production, that may very well change in 2021. Propane advocates think that their fuel is not getting the kind of attention that it deserves from policy-makers, regulators, and environmental lobbyists.

Opinion

Latino voters strongly back climate action, park access

Sunbathers in San Francisco's Dolores Park during the pandemic. (Photo: eddie-hernandez.com, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Latinos have long-been committed to protecting public lands and rivers. Yet, California Latinos are almost twice as likely to live somewhere that is “nature deprived” than white communities, meaning there are far fewer parks, streams, beaches, and other natural places nearby.

News

Card club agrees to record $5.3 million penalty

Artichoke Joe's Casino in San Bruno, south of San Francisco. (Photo: Wikipedia)

State law enforcement authorities say a settlement has been reached with Artichoke Joe’s Casino, a major California card club, for violation of money laundering laws and for misleading investigators. The casino agreed to pay a $5.3 million penalty.

Opinion

Memo to Biden: Let’s rebuild infrastructure together

Workers repairing Polk Street near Pacific Avenue in San Francisco. (Photo: Susan Leg Anthony, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: President Biden wants America to Build Back Better — and we at the Associated Builders and Contractors Northern California (ABC NorCal) completely agree. The foundation for the country’s economic rebound will depend on the big infrastructure plans the president has for the country.

Podcast

Capitol Weekly Podcast: Bill Wong

Veteran political strategist Bill Wong has been a longtime leader in California’s Asian Pacific Islander political community, and is a recognized expert on AAPI voters. While Wong should have been celebrating last week’s appointment of Rob Bonta as California Attorney General – the first Filipino American to hold the office – he was instead dealing with the fallout of a nationwide spree of racially-motivated attacks, culminating in a mass shooting in Georgia that claimed the lives of six Asian women.

News

Rob Bonta picked for state attorney general

Assemblymember Rob Bonta, an Alameda County Democrat, picked by Gov. Gavin Newsom as the next state attorney general. (Photo: AP/Rich Pedroncelli)

Rob Bonta, the first Filipino-American to serve in the California Legislature, was appointed state attorney general on Wednesday,  filling the vacancy created by Xavier Becerra, who left to join President Joe Biden’s administration.

News

State stem cell agency follows the money — $5.5 billion

A pipette and receptacles used in stem cell research. (Photo: CI Photos)

The talk at the California stem cell agency this week was of ”boiling the ocean,” the meaning of “unlikely” and “DEI.” All of which involves how $5.5 billion in taxpayer dollars will be used over the next decade or so.

Opinion

Keep, improve California’s End of Life Option Act

An elderly ill patient receives care from a nurse. (Photo: Ocskay Mark, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Six years ago, I joined terminally ill Californians to pass a law that would provide them the option to die gently when they can no longer tolerate their suffering. This is personal to me: I watched my mother’s lengthy suffering when she died from cancer.  People often thank me and share their stories why the End of Life Option Act is important to them.

News

Despite delay, hope stays alive in once-a-decade redistricting

An illustration of California cities that will become part of redrawn political districts for the 2022 elections. (Image: jmrainbow, via Shutterstock)

California’s decennial battle to redraw the state’s political boundaries has moved into uncharted territory, a casualty of the pandemic and unprecedented delays in the release of census data. The U.S. Census Bureau recently announced its data – the foundation of political map-making — will be released to all states this year by Sept. 30, a full six months later than the original release date.

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