No. 97: Capitol Weekly’s Top 100

Illustration by Chris Shary for Capitol Weekly.

97.  Bob Giroux The lobbying firm of Lang, Hansen, Giroux & Associates (formerly Lang, Hansen, O’Malley and Miller) is a Sacramento powerhouse; Joe Lang is at No. 59 this year, and Bev Hansen has been on this list too many times to count. The recent addition of Bob Giroux’s name to the shingle might

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News

LAO: Coastal areas should begin preparing for sea level rise

A seaside condominium complex in Monterey, facing a rising sea level. (Photo: Steve Smith, Shutterstock)

California’s coast could experience sea level rise (SLR) ranging from about half of 1 foot by 2030 up to about 7 feet by 2100. Periodic events like storms and high tides will produce even higher water levels and increase the risk of flooding. Rising seas will also erode coastal cliffs, dunes, and beaches which will affect shorefront structures and recreation.

News

New UC president Michael Drake takes over

Students walking on the UC Berkeley campus, pre-pandemic times. (Photo: Ioana Catalina E, via Shutterstock)

Michael V. Drake: Welcome back to California. Drake, a medical doctor, is the new president of the sprawling University of California, one of the world’s premier academic institutions. Drake, 70, is the first African American to hold the position in the university’s 152-year history. He took over this week, replacing the retiring Janet Napolitano.

Opinion

Needed: Secure system to track electronic nicotine products

An array of high-quality vaping pens.(Photo: Kevin Yuan, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Both in the context of the current economic crisis precipitated by COVID-19 – which is stretching state budgets beyond the breaking point – and as part of ongoing efforts to prevent the sale of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) products to minors, the debate in the California Legislature over the sale of ENDS products represents an opportunity for lawmakers to ensure that the state capitalizes on the opportunity to meaningfully addresses public health concerns.

News

Auditor slams state mental-health system, revives Laura’s Law

A troubled woman alone deals with issues alone. (Photo: Stokkete, via Shutterstock)

A massive and highly critical state auditor’s report has given new life to legislation to deal with California’s notoriously troubled mental-health system. The shift comes as state lawmakers, convening amid the COVID-19 pandemic, face hundreds of bills in the closing days of the legislative session.

News

Census facing uncertainty, hostile president

Ladera Ranch, census-designated community in southern Orange County. (Photo: bonandbon, via Shutterstock)

A lot is riding on this decennial tally: It affects the way federal funding is distributed and it can have a dramatic impact on the boundaries — and number — of political districts. This time around, California’s congressional seats are on shaky ground. But the uncertainty stems as much from President Trump’s actions as from the long-awaited 2020 census numbers, which have been delayed because of the pandemic.

Opinion

Post-pandemic life threatens ADA’s progress

A weathered parking sign for the disabled on the Santa Mona Pier. (TFoxFoto, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: July 26 marked the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). While the ADA brought much-needed improvements to many aspects of the lives of persons with disabilities, it also fell short in key areas – especially in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.

News

Ballot battle underway to keep stem cell agency alive

DNA is injected into a stem cell. (Photo: Spectral-Design, via Shuttertock)

The California stem cell agency has just finished pumping $5.3 million into the fight to save the lives of Covid-19 victims. And — in a ballot-box bonus — its efforts are already surfacing in the ballot campaign to rescue the agency from its own demise. The agency is running out of money. It will begin closing its doors this fall without major financial support that it hopes will come from Proposition 14, a $5.5 billion bond measure on the November ballot.

Opinion

If CPUC eliminates ‘decoupling,’ water rates would rise

Sprinklers watering a field in Scotts Valley, Calif. (Photo: Michael Barajas, via Shutterstock)

As early as Aug. 6, the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) could vote to adopt a proposal that would eliminate a best-practice regulatory tool – known as decoupling – that currently removes the incentive of water suppliers to sell more water.

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