Opinion

Investing in Alzheimer’s leads to earlier diagnoses, better care

An abstract view of a doctor serching the human brain for Alzheimer's and dementia. (Image: PopTika, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Gov. Gavin Newsom has the chance to improve the lives of hundreds of thousands of Californians impacted by Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia by signing SB 48, a bill on his desk that would provide much needed aid and training to Medi-Cal healthcare providers to improve early detection of cognitive impairment. As the daughter of someone living with Alzheimer’s disease, I know first-hand the impact this legislation will have

News

Rebooting huge Medi-Cal system puts pressure on health plans

Photo illustration of a card identifying the recipient of Medi-Cal services. (Image: California Healthline)

When Denise Williams’ baby boy was 2 months old, she became alarmed by a rattling sound in his lungs and took him to the emergency room. While undergoing treatment, he spiraled into a disabling neurological disorder.

News

Remembering Scott Lay, 1972-2021

Scott Lay (Photo: John Howard)

In the months after California voters removed Gray Davis from office, I would roll out of bed at 5:30 a.m. and log on to find a document waiting for me. It was from Scott Lay. The document was the rough draft of that morning’s edition of The Roundup, a daily email digest of California political news and information that went to nearly 10,000 subscribers.

News

Stem cell: California’s ARS and its multibillion-dollar clout

The Lorry I. Loke Stem Cell Research Building at Stanford University. (Photo: CIRM)

California’s taxpayer-financed stem cell agency will give away $98 million later this week, but the agency’s full, 35-member board is not going to have much to do with making decisions about who gets what. That’s because 17 members of the governing board are barred from voting on applications for any of its research awards, which will ultimately total roughly $5 billion over the next decade or so.

Opinion

Proposed tax hikes would damage fragile economy

A man in a bicycle repair shop uses a laptop computer to run his business. (Photo: Mintimages, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: It’s like pulling a life raft away from a struggling swimmer.  Congress wouldn’t look at what it’s doing to small businesses that way, but that is what it will do if it carries through on some harmful proposals being considered.

News

Capitol Weekly Interview: Susan Talamantes Eggman

Susan Talamantes Eggman is congratulated in the Assembly following passage of her right-to-die measure. (Photo: AP/Rich Pedroncelli)

Susan Talamantes Eggman was raised in Turlock, where her family owned a small almond orchard and apiary (bee-keeping), and her first job that wasn’t on the family farm started her on a path to working in health care and mental health throughout her life.

Podcast

Capitol Weekly Podcast: SB9 and Accessory Dwelling Units

Accessory Dwelling Unit, image courtesy of United Dwelling

A little-discussed impact of SB9 is that it helps homeowners finance new construction on their property without tying up the equity in their existing home. We’re joined today by Steven Dietz of United Dwelling, an LA-based housing builder leading the Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) industry with the most rental units built in California.

News

Reforming California’s recall system gets close look

A woman casts an early ballot in the recall election at L.A.'s Union Station. (Photo: Ringo Chiu, via Shutterstock)

The word “recall” dominated California politics this year, but it’s not over: The recall may go before voters again, this time in the form of a reform measure placed on the statewide ballot by lawmakers. The proposed reform stems, in part, from complaints — mostly, but not entirely from Democrats — that California’s recall process is deeply flawed, allowing a replacement candidate with scant voter support to become governor.

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