Judge blocks tax disclosure bill aimed at Trump

People at a 2017 Laguna Beach rally demanding to see Trump's tax returns. (Photo: Steve Bruckmann

A federal judge tentatively blocked a new California law requiring presidential and gubernatorial contenders in California’s primary elections to release five years of tax returns — a law that was aimed squarely at President Donald Trump.U.S. District Judge Morrison C. England Jr. said he will issue a final ruling by Oct. 1. In issuing a temporary injunction, England cited constitutional grounds for his decision, saying disclosure isn’t a constitutional requirement to seek office.

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News

Speculation still swirls over CTA chief’s firing

Joe Nuñez , former executive director of the California Teachers Association. (Image: Screen capture from CTA video)

California’s education and political worlds are abuzz with speculation about three recent developments, little of which has to do with schools. What led to the abrupt firing of Joe Nuñez as executive director of the 325,000-member California Teachers Association, one of the biggest and most powerful labor groups in California?

Opinion

Credit bill will hurt loan availability

A bank customer receives cash from his savings account. (Photo: Syda Productions, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: The California Legislature has just passed AB 539, which will significantly reduce the ability of millions of Californians to access credit when needed. Legislators will tout the bill passing as a success, when in reality, it benefits a small group of lenders at the expense of everyday Californians with less-than-perfect credit.

News

PPIC: A look at California’s ‘exclusive electorate’

Voters head into their precinct to cast their ballots. (Photo: Shutterstock)

The people who go to the polls in California are very different from those who don’t—a gap that has far-reaching implications for our democracy and political future. The fact that a relatively small, unrepresentative group of Californians elect officials and make policies is an urgent challenge for the state, especially as the population continues to

News

Capitol Weekly Interview: Jodi Hicks

Jodi Hicks at her office in Sacramento in November 2017. (Photo: AP/Rich Pedroncelli)

Jodi Hicks is co-chair of Mercury Public Affairs’ Sacramento office. She is the first woman and the first Asian-America to serve in that role and is regarded as one of the Capitol community’s foremost advocates of quality health care. Capitol Weekly’s Chuck McFadden caught up with her recently for a chat.

News

Rise above: A slice of life at Pizza Supreme Being

A Pizza Supreme Being pie. Photo by Scott Duncan, Capitol Weekly)

REVIEW: When you enter Pizza Supreme Being, it looks simple. Simple menu (slices and whole pies; 5 flavors), simple –nonexistent really—décor; one quick glance encompasses the entire interior. There are 20 seats total, including patio, a self-serve cooler with a well-chosen selection of sodas, craft beer and wine, and a letter board menu. As I walk in, a stylish young woman declares, “reminds me of cool pizzerias where you’d have little league.”

News

PG&E by any other name: Golden State Power Light & Gas?

A utility worker handles repairs on a power pole. (Photo: Richard Thornton, via Shutterstock)

PG&E’s reputation has been so battered over its wildfire liabilities and other problems that some think it should change its name. A group of bondholders trying to take over the utility company has proposed that they re-brand it to Golden State Power Light & Gas Co. They made the proposal during proceedings in PG&E’s bankruptcy court case earlier this year.

News

Vaccination bills signed amid angry protests

Demonstrators outside the governor's office in the state Capitol protesting vaccination legislation. (Photo: Rich Pedroncelli/AP)

Amid shouting and pounding on doors by hundreds of vaccination opponents, Gov. Gavin Newsom late Monday signed two bills designed to limit medical exemptions for school vaccinations. Hundreds of vaccination opponents delayed state Senate action on the bills for two hours by shouting from the gallery and displaying an upside-down American flag.

News

Ballot targeted for $5.5 billion stem cell initiative

Stem cell research using what's known as a PCR strip. (Image: Science Photo via Shutterstock)

Backers of a California ballot initiative to provide $5.5 billion more for the state’s cash-strapped stem cell agency say they will take their first official step by the end of this month.That’s when they will submit the proposed measure to California election officials and trigger a many-months-long process. The effort is aimed at ensuring that the nearly 15-year-old research effort survives in a meaningful way beyond next year.

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