China Lake: When a quake hits a secret area

A highway fracture caused by the Ridgecrest quake and aftershock in early July. (Photo: Nick Sklias, via Shutterstock)

The epicenter of the quakes was the Naval Weapons Air Station at China Lake, which does research into military weapons in the Mojave Desert. Because of the secret nature of its work, the state Seismic Safety Commission has been unable to go in and check out what is happening, said the commission’s chairman Mike Gardner.

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Opinion

Let’s get plastic out of our food — now

Plastic garbage on the beach, tossed there or brought in by the tide. (Photo: Larina Marina, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: You’ve probably heard the phrase, “You are what you eat” a thousand times. It’s a motto usually used to encourage skipping the fries or chips for the recommended servings of veggies and fruits. But lately this phrase has a taken on an alarming new meaning. We are eating plastic.

News

Temps suffer higher injury rates than permanent workers

PriorityWorkForce office in Santa Ana. (Photo: Eli Wolfe, FairWarning)

Last October, Erick Solis, a 19-year-old temp worker at a Los Angeles food company, lost two fingers when his hand got caught in an unguarded dough-rolling machine. Cal/OSHA, the state job safety agency, cited the company, JSL Foods Inc., for willful violations because an almost identical accident had happened before

News

Our political polling shifts into high gear for 2020

Attendees at a 2018 political rally in Santa Ana. (Photo: Juan Camilo Bernal, via Shutterstock)

In the 2016 and 2018 election cycles, Capitol Weekly conducted several surveys for the primary and general elections. We examined voters’ opinions on the contests for president, U.S. Senate, governor, Legislature and Congress, as well as on ballot measureas before California voters. In total, we heard from over 100,000 voters, providing us with a significant dataset of voters and their preferences.

News

Mental health workers reject Kaiser contract

Kaiser Permanente workers picketing during a five-day strike in December. (Photo: National Union of Healthcare Workers) United Healthcare Workers

Mental health workers at Kaiser Permanente have overwhelmingly rejected a contract offer — a move that followed months of negotiations between Kaiser and the National Union of Healthcare Workers. Negotiations between Kaiser and NUHW are continuing.

News

A battle for the popular vote

People jam a political rally during the 2008 presidential campaign. (Photo: Joseph Sohm, via Shutterstock)

Millions of ballots are cast in a presidential election, but winning the White House comes down to just this: 270 votes.That’s the majority in the Electoral College, which picks the president. Sometimes the selection follows the national popular vote, sometimes not, and a candidate can become president by winning as little as 11 states.

Opinion

A key move to address California’s wildfire crisis

A resident watches smoke billowing from the Woolsey Fire, November, 2018, in Southern California. (Photo: BrittanyNY, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: California is facing a wildfire crisis of epic proportions, and with the 2019 fire season already upon us, the immediate threat of yet another highly destructive and costly wildfire looms over communities all across the state. Everyone agrees that something must be done to address this crisis, and yet legislators still have not taken definitive action.

News

For California, yet another weird ranking

Cable cars on California Street in San Francisco, an iconic image. (Photo: canadastock, via Shutterstock)

The ranking comes from WalletHub, a financial services company that likes to rank cities and states on various topics. WalletHub got a group of college professors together and asked them to round up and interpret statistics on such fun factors as “marinas per capita” (Nebraska didn’t do well.) Shockingly, we’re not even in the running in that category.  Florida, New York and Maryland are tied for the lead.

News

USC pays UCSD $50 million to settle recruitment fight

Students outside the library at the University of California, San Diego. (Photo: Stanislavsky, via Shutterstock)

The University of Southern California in Los Angeles is coughing up $50 million and publicly apologizing for its tactics in recruiting a star Alzheimer’s researcher from UC San Diego, it was reported Thursday. The Los Angeles Times story about the unprecedented settlement described the case as an “ugly academic war.” It had the potential of bringing $340 million in research grants to USC.  

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