Posts Tagged: low-income

Opinion

SB 525 would devastate health care for the state’s most vulnerable

Image by Ground Picture via Shutterstock

OPINION – California’s population age 65 and greater will nearly double by 2030, increasing by 4 million. People are living longer than ever before, and as a result, more people will need assisted living and skilled nursing services.

Senate Bill 525 directly threatens our ability to care for this growing population by forcing additional costs

Podcast

#CAHOUSING: Affordable Housing

Chris Nichols, Marilyn Ezzy Ashcraft, Peter Cohen, Mark Stivers and Chione Fleagal at A Conference on Housing, March 9, 2023. Photo By Scott Duncan, Capitol Weekly

CAPITOL WEEKLY PODCAST: This Special Episode of the Capitol Weekly Podcast was recorded live at Capitol Weekly’s Conference on Housing, and presents Panel 2: Affordable Housing.

News

Medi-Cal shift could roil coverage for low-income Californians

A man receives a one-shot vaccination against COVID-19 in Covina. (Photo: Ringo Chiu, via Shutterstock)

Almost 2 million of California’s poorest and most medically fragile residents may have to switch health insurers as a result of a new strategy by the state to improve care in its Medicaid program. A first-ever statewide contracting competition to participate in the program, known as Medi-Cal, required commercial managed-care plans to rebid for their contracts and compete against others hoping to take those contracts away.

Opinion

California pondering limits on low-income broadband subsidies

A person uses a laptop computer to go online and search for housing. (Photo: Tada Images, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Expanding broadband access is key to advancing equity in our increasingly digital society. So why are California regulators taking steps to restrict the use of federal and state broadband subsidies to support communities that need them most, effectively widening the digital divide?

News

A high-energy debate erupts over California’s solar power

Roof top solar panels on rooftops in a Southern California neighborhood. (Photo: Simone Hogan, via Shutterstock)

Former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger championed an effort to install a million solar energy systems throughout the state. Fifteen years later, lured by incentives, there are more than 1.3 million solar rooftops that produce enough electricity for millions of homes across California. But a sharp debate is brewing among energy experts, the utilities, consumers and labor interests about fairness of the original program, called “net metering.”

Opinion

Critical broadband access getting attention — finally

An illustration of high-speed broadband connections serving a city. (Image: kkssr, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: The gaps between the connected and unconnected have never been clearer as California continues to grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic. The lack of access to online classes, employment opportunities and telehealth visits became more apparent when COVID-19 shut down our state.

Opinion

Proposed auto insurance rules would hurt poor, people of color

The Harbor Freeway at rush hour in Los Angeles. (Photo: Joseph Sohm, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: The California Department of Insurance, having identified a disparity, has established a worthy goal of expanding auto insurance discounts to more low-income consumers and communities of color. But as it pursues that goal, the department must keep in mind a foundational principle in healing problems: Do no harm.

Opinion

PUC should speedily okay Verizon’s purchase of TracFone

A smart phone user with his device. (Photo: TK Studio, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: With the continued struggles exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, it is vitally important for consumers, especially historically underserved consumers and business communities to have access to reliable and affordable mobile services.

Opinion

Community health centers offer true fairness in vaccinations

A man receives a COVID-19 vaccination from a nurse at a clinic set up in the parking lot of the Los Angeles Mission. (Photo: Ringo Chiu, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Many of the 55 elderly patients arrived for their second COVID-19 vaccines, leaning on their children’s arms or walkers. Most were Latinx or Black. All were age 75 or older, and they were eager to get vaccinated against the deadly virus.

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