Posts Tagged: California Supreme Court

Opinion

Court ruling curbs contractors, agents in favor of lawyers

Illustration of a talent agent's files. (Image: Olivier Le Moal, via Shutterstock)

OPINION:Every day, California’s contractors negotiate written and oral contracts for clients and other third parties. So do art dealers, retail store clerks, car brokers, insurance, real estate and talent agents, auctioneers, architects and others. If the state Supreme Court refuses review on a recently published 2nd District Court of Appeals decision, any of those transactions done without an attorney signing off on the terms will be unlawful.

News

Even for CA ballot fights, Prop. 22’s price tag is historic

A vehicle for Lyft and Uber awaits customers in Redwood City. (Photo: Sundry Photography, via Shutterstock)

Proposition 22 has ignited the most expensive ballot proposition fight in California history, exemplifying the emerging 21st century battle of traditional employment-vs.-the gig economy. Meanwhile, the Trump administration is poised to weigh in.

News

Bullet train faces difficult journey

An artist's conception of the bullet train in operation. (Image, High Speed Rail Authority)

California’s bullet train may be in trouble again, as a recent court ruling and potential funding obstacles have plunged the transportation project into further uncertainty. The latest setbacks add to lingering questions over whether the $64 billion project can both meet its scheduled completion date and guarantee enough funding.

News

State Supreme Court to consider public pension cuts

The California Supreme Court, left to right, standing: Mariano-Florentino Cuellar, Carol Corrigan, Goodwin Liu, and Leondra Kruger. Seated: Kathryn Werdegar, Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye, and Ming Chin.

Calpensions: The state Supreme Court last week agreed to hear an appeal of a groundbreaking ruling that allows cuts in the pensions earned by current state and local government workers, including judges. When judges have an obvious conflict of interest and excuse themselves from ruling on a case, the legal term is “recuse.” But the seven Supreme Court justices seem unlikely to recuse themselves from a possible landmark ruling on this Marin County pension case.

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