Posts Tagged: racial

Opinion

California needs to establish an Office of Racial Equity

Demonstrators seeking racial justice for the Asian community at a March rally in Alhambra. (Photo: Ringo Chiu, via Shutterstock)

As the nation continues to grapple with devastating police violence against African Americans and rising hate crimes against the Asian-American and Pacific Islander Community, many government leaders continue to talk a good game about the importance of racial justice.

We need a lot more than talk. It’s long past time to

Opinion

Community colleges’ remedial classes spur racial inequity

College students in class in the era of the pandemic. (Photo: Syda Productions, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: As a political science major, I’ve studied our country’s history and listened to my professors talk about political movements. I’ve learned that change rarely happens unless people speak up when they see inequities and injustice. That’s why I’m speaking up about a systemic injustice a t our state’s community colleges. These institutions disproportionately enroll Black and Latinx students in remedial courses and this is a key driver of inequities in who graduates and transfers to four-year universities. It’s racist and it’s wrong.

News

Poll: Kids will be worse off than parents; rich-poor gap grows

A check-cashing outlet in Los Angeles, often used by low-income families. (Photo: image_vulture, via Shutterstock)

A solid majority of Californians say children growing up in the state today will be worse off financially than their parents, while more than two-thirds say the gap between rich and poor is widening. In the past year, more than four in ten households with annual incomes below $40,000 had work hours or pay reduced, and an equal share had to cut back on food.

News

California voters: The ‘haves’ and the ‘have-nots’

Latinos taking the Pledge of Allegiance in Los Angeles. (Photo: Spirit of America)

Only half of California adults can be expected to vote in this year’s presidential election, and they are likely to be very different from those who do not vote—in their demographic and economic backgrounds and in their political attitudes. These are among the key findings of a report released Tuesday evening by the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC).

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