Posts Tagged: meeting

News

Stem cell agency OKs $5 million for COVID-19 research

Illustration: Aleksey Novikov, via Shutterstock),

California’s stem cell agency, in an emergency action, has allocated $5 million for research into treatments for Covid-19 and set the deadline for the first applications for one week from today. The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) approved the funding Friday during an emergency meeting of its governing board. 

News

Stem cell agency plots against its own death

A pipette and recepticles used in stem cell research. (Photo: CI Photos)

California’s $3 billion stem cell research program later this month is expected to unveil detailed plans for extending its life beyond the middle of 2020 in hopes of avoiding a lingering death. The latest proposals, which are not yet public, are scheduled to be discussed Nov. 27.

News

Stem cell agency faces leadership challenge

Human embryonic stem cells. (Photo: California Institute for Regenerative Medicine)

California’s 12-year-old stem cell research effort is expected to give away tens of millions of dollars in public this week, but its most important matters — issues that deal with its survival and future — likely will be discussed behind closed doors at a meeting Thursday of its governing board. On the table is the leadership of the $3 billion organization, which is scheduled to run out of cash in just three years.

News

CIRM eyes final $800 million for stem cell research

A liquid nitrogen bank containing a suspension of stem cells. (Photo: Elena Pavlovich)

If you are interested in how the state of California is going to spend its final $800 million or so on stem cell research, you should catch a key meeting next Tuesday in Oakland, which also can be heard online. The session involves the 29-member, governing board of the $3 billion California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), as the state stem cell agency is formally known.

News

State targets ‘bubble boy’ syndrome

Young David Vetter, who died from severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in the 1990s. (Photo: Biotechnology and Society)

California’s stem cell agency is ready to award $20 million on Thursday to a UCLA researcher to assist in his 30-year search for a widely available cure for what has come to be known as the “bubble boy” syndrome– severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID).

News

Reporter’s Notebook: The search for unity

A delegate at the Democratic National Convention passes by a group of pro-Bernie Sanders protesters. (Photo: Brad Bailey)

Hillary Clinton accepted the Democratic nomination for president Thursday as the nation’s first female nominee of a major party, a historic moment captured in a blaze of pomp and color. It was the culmination of four days of speeches that targeted the national convention’s fundamental theme — unity. But in the California delegation — the largest of the 50 states — unity at times was a rare commodity.

Opinion

A ‘little guy’ and the water board

Watering crops in California's Central Valley. (Photo: CRSHELARE, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: The State Water Resources Control Board (Board) has tried for too long to bully Byron- Bethany Irrigation District (BBID), and we’ve had enough. It’s time the Board’s misguided case against BBID ends and remove the regulatory limbo the farmers within BBID currently face.

News

Coastal Commission fires executive director

The California coast along Redwood National Park, north Humboldt County, (Photo: Don Forthuber, redwoods.info)

MORRO BAY, Calif. – The California Coastal Commission fired Executive Director Charles Lester late Wednesday, after several commissioners complained about a lack of communication from Lester and the staff. The action, a 7-5 vote by the 12-member commission, was taken publicly following a discussion behind closed doors.

News

Special session: Fixing the potholes

Downtown Los Angeles, as traffic zips along. (Photo: Sean Pavone)

Gov. Brown’s call for a special legislative session to fix California’s crumbling roads, highways and bridges comes as music to the ears of those who build big projects. For months, groups representing labor, contractors, local governments, transportation interests and others worked on legislation to revamp the state’s roads and ease the movement of freight at the state’s ports. That legislation may serve as the centerpiece of the special session.

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