Posts Tagged: latino

News

Census data shows CA voter participation up across the board

A voter casts his ballot during the 2020 general election at a voting center in L.A.'s Pantages Theatre. (Photo: Ringo Chiu, via Shutterstock)

The U.S. Census Bureau’s voter survey of the November 2020 election shows that, once again, California saw increased participation in general and across nearly all demographics.  A startling finding in the recently released data: In 2020, African American participation hit 64%, very close to 2008’s record 65.2%, when Barack Obama ran for president for the first time.

News

Coronavirus devastates California farm workers

Farm workers with masks pick strawberries near Carlsbad, San Diego County. (Photo: Simone Hogan, via Shutterstock)

Back in April, when the lockdown was first beginning, a California Farm Bureau study reported that the agriculture sector had lost more than 2.4 million jobs directly attributable to the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, along with the financial hit, farm workers are suffering through increased risk of deadly infection.

Opinion

It’s time: Newsom should appoint Latino to U.S. Senate seat

California Latinos celebrate the 3election results at a Nov. 7 rally in downtown Los Angeles. (Photo: Matt Gush)

OPINION: The election of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris has left Harris’ Senate seat open. In appointing someone to fill this seat, Governor Newsom has the opportunity to secure another historic first by selecting our state’s first Latino or Latina U.S. Senator.

Podcast

Capitol Weekly Podcast: David Cruz says “Yes” on 22

David Cruz is the head of the Economic and Business Council for the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC). LULAC has declined to take a position on California’s hotly-contested Proposition 22, but Cruz has been actively engaged in making the case to pass the measure, including an appearance in an October debate against Latina activist Dolores Huerta, who is in opposition. David joined us by phone to discuss his support for Prop. 22, including a novel take on how to view the nearly quarter-billion dollars spent on the campaign.

Podcast

Capitol Weekly Podcast: Redistricting Commission’s representation problem

Detail of an antique California Bear Flag handerkerchief with detailed Grizzly Bear. Photo by the Bear Flag Museum

California’s Citizens Independent Redistricting Commission is generally regarded as a model of its kind, achieving balance and representation through a carefully constructed mix of quotas, political gamesmanship and random selection. How then, did the first round of new commissioners selected on July 2 (eight of a total of 14) fail to include a single Latino, the state’s largest ethnic group?

News

Pandemic: CA pauses multimillion-dollar testing expansion

A coronavirus anti-body testing station in Palo Alto run by Stanford University. (Photo: Sundry Photography, via Shutterstock)

In April, Gov. Gavin Newsom launched a multimillion-dollar state initiative to bring COVID-19 testing to the people and places with the least access: rural towns and disadvantaged inner-city neighborhoods. California is now halting its expansion, citing costs, even as the state is getting walloped by record-setting spikes in new infections and double-digit increases in hospitalizations.

News

CA120: Behold the real numbers of California’s 2018 election

An illustration suggesting the variations in the voting population. (Image: Julian Tromeur, via Shutterstock)

There are plenty of things to look at now that California counties have updated their voter files with the 2018 general election vote history. This is our first chance to see what really happened, as opposed to what people thought had happened based on the outcomes.

Opinion

Student success: Much more needs to be done

Children at a California public school respond to a teacher's question. (Photo: Monkey Business Images, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: The new comprehensive analysis of California’s PreK-12 education system, Getting Down to Facts II, revealed that the state is moving in the right direction with reforms put in place over the last decade, but more importantly it showed much more must be done to support student success.

Opinion

Higher education: Students’ basic needs not met

Students at the graduation ceremonies of UCLA. (Photo: Joseph Sohm)

OPINION: California is recognized as an innovative economic leader boasting access to world class higher education, yet the state is quickly being outpaced in the percentage of students who actually complete their degrees.  What drives this chasm between shining opportunity and lackluster outcomes? One reason is as simple as it is startling: Students’ basic needs are not being met.

Opinion

The struggle of classified education workers

A janitor mops the floor in a new school building. (Photo: Siyanight, via Shutterstock)

If passion for children were enough to pay the rent, classified education workers would be some of the wealthiest people in the Golden State. Instead, the hard-working teaching assistants, janitors, special education aides and cafeteria workers who keep our K-12 schools running barely scrape by during the school year, only to face hunger in the summer months when their paychecks stop. 

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