Posts Tagged: Gray Davis

Opinion

Can a Dem strategy punish the GOP for extremism, falsehoods?

Protesters at Laguna Beach complain about California's rules to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo: mikeledray, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: The delusional conspiracy theories unleashed on Americans to explain the defeat of former President Donald Trump have done more than raise the threat level to U.S. democracy and to hardworking elections supervisors. They are fracturing the Republican Party in ways its own officials would prefer to overlook while angling to regain control of Congress.

Opinion

Fruitless recall boosted Newsom’s political position

San Francisco, USA. Sept. 14, 2021. California Governor Gavin Newsom, speaks to the press at a labor union event in San Francisco on Election Day, for the 2021 California gubernatorial recall election

OPINION: “Never strike a king unless you are sure you shall kill him,” Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote in 1843. He couldn’t have foreseen the attempted recall of Gov. Gavin Newsom. But it is apropos:  The recall not only failed miserably to yank Newsom from office, but actually immeasurably strengthened his political position.

News

Recall elections increasingly define political landscape

A newspaper's election gives readers information about the Sept. 14, 2021, recall election. (Photo: Matt Gush, via Shutterstock)

California’s attention was focused recently on the failed attempt to recall Gov. Newsom as a rare event of historical magnitude. In fact, recall elections happen all the time, and all but a relative handful of these obscure contests disappear into the limbo of history.

Podcast

Capitol Weekly Podcast: Hilary McLean, Roger Salazar a duo again

Photo by Tim Foster, Capitol Weekly

Prominent political consultants Roger Salazar and Hilary McLean worked together in tiny digs in Gov. Gray Davis’ press office before the current crop of Capitol Weekly interns were even born. Those were trying times for the Davis communications team — you may ‘recall’ that Davis’ gig didn’t end well.

News

How a CalPERS-sponsored bill increased pensions

The CalPERS headquarters in Sacramento. (Photo: Kit Leong)

The annual payment to CalPERS for state worker pensions next fiscal year is expected to be $7 billion, a jump from $6.4 billion this year — and a quantum leap from $160 million when a pension increase, SB 400, was approved 20 years ago.

Opinion

Clock ticking on desert protection

Sunrise in the Mojave Desert, CAstle Peaks. (Photo: sierralara, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: The window of opportunity is rapidly closing for Senate Leader Toni Atkins and the California Legislature to save the Mojave Desert from Cadiz, Inc.’s reckless plan to suck the water out from under one of the Earth’s driest places and sell it to water golf courses and suburban lawns as far away as Orange County. Killed by Barack Obama and revived by Donald Trump, the water mining project would dramatically overdraw the aquifer below the desert and almost certainly stop the flow of water to the springs that preserve the Mojave’s fragile biodiversity.

News

CA120: Deconstructing California’s top-two primary

A political rally in southern California during the 2016 election cycle. (Photo: Joseph Sohm)

With the close of the 2018 primary election cycle, we get another chance to see how campaigns have evolved under California’s top-two open primary system. The most noteworthy change appears to be the manner by which campaigns are extending their reach across the partisan aisle. But they are not doing it in the way that the authors of the Top Two Candidates Open Primary Act, which took effect in 2011, intended.

News

Reagan, Schwarzenegger … Winfrey?

Oprah Winfrey at a campaign rally for Barack Obama. (Photo: Krista Kennell)

Will she?  Will she really? “She,” of course, is Oprah Winfrey.  And after her thunderous speech at the Golden Globes last week, she’s become the latest California-based celebrity to be touted for high political office.

News

GOP’s Chad Mayes: A warrior in an uphill battle

Assembly GOP Leader Chad Mayes of Yucca Valley, during an August 2016 floor session. (Photo: AP/Rich Pedroncelli)

Chad Mayes, the affable leader of Assembly Republicans, says he wakes up every morning thinking about the low state of his party in California. Mayes has plenty to ponder. Republicans have no statewide officeholders, a paltry 26 percent of registered voters (just a bit higher than the 24 percent who decline to state a party affiliation) and Mayes himself has to deal with a 25-55 Democratic supermajority in his Assembly.

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