Posts Tagged: floor

News

China Lake: When a quake hits a secret area

A highway fracture caused by the Ridgecrest quake and aftershock in early July. (Photo: Nick Sklias, via Shutterstock)

The epicenter of the quakes was the Naval Weapons Air Station at China Lake, which does research into military weapons in the Mojave Desert. Because of the secret nature of its work, the state Seismic Safety Commission has been unable to go in and check out what is happening, said the commission’s chairman Mike Gardner.

News

Amendments: A long and winding road

State Capitol in Sacramento. (Photo: Shuttesrstock)

In the Legislature, there are several types of amendments — amendment is a fancy word for “change” — that can be made to any number of measures, including bills, resolutions and constitutional amendments.

News

Capitol myth vs. reality, Part Deux

State Capitol in Sacramento. (Photo: Shuttesrstock)

Welcome to Part II of our deep dive into the myths and realities of legislation. This time we’ll take a look at how bills are amended and moved around. After our earlier piece appeared, one reader called to thank us – he said it helped him sleep at night. We’re glad we were able to help. And now to the bills: There’s a lot going on here …

Analysis

Reconsideration: A second bite at the apple

The state Assembly in session. (Photo: Capitol Public Radio)

When a bill in the California Legislature fails passage either in committee or on the floor of the Assembly or Senate, it can be granted “reconsideration.” That can mean a bill gets a new lease on life — or not.

News

Under the radar: engrossing and enrolling

(Photo illustration: Erce, via Shutterstock)

After the two houses of the Legislature pass a bill, but before that bill reaches the governor’s desk, the legislation goes through a very important process called “engrossing and enrolling.” Engrossing also occurs after each amendment to a bill. This is a critical procedure and it takes place outside the view of the public or curious journalists.

Opinion

The attack of the super-pollutants

A powerplant at sunset. (Photo: David Crockett)

OPINION: As Hollywood brings a new crop of super-hero movies to our theaters, state policymakers are considering action against a group of particularly nefarious villains known as “super-pollutants.” These contaminants, including black carbon and methane, are both rapidly warming our planet and also damaging human health.

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