Posts Tagged: statewide

Opinion

Keep, improve California’s End of Life Option Act

An elderly ill patient receives care from a nurse. (Photo: Ocskay Mark, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Six years ago, I joined terminally ill Californians to pass a law that would provide them the option to die gently when they can no longer tolerate their suffering. This is personal to me: I watched my mother’s lengthy suffering when she died from cancer.  People often thank me and share their stories why the End of Life Option Act is important to them.

Opinion

Community colleges’ remedial classes spur racial inequity

College students in class in the era of the pandemic. (Photo: Syda Productions, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: As a political science major, I’ve studied our country’s history and listened to my professors talk about political movements. I’ve learned that change rarely happens unless people speak up when they see inequities and injustice. That’s why I’m speaking up about a systemic injustice a t our state’s community colleges. These institutions disproportionately enroll Black and Latinx students in remedial courses and this is a key driver of inequities in who graduates and transfers to four-year universities. It’s racist and it’s wrong.

News

New laws: California at forefront of health policy innovation

Gov. Gavin Newsom, who recently signed into law major health care-related approved by lawmakers. (Photo: Rich Pedroncelli, AP)

When Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom concluded the chaotic legislative year Wednesday — his deadline to sign or veto bills — what emerged wasn’t the sweeping platform he and state lawmakers had outlined at the beginning of the year. But the dozens of health care measures they approved included first-in-the-nation policies to require more comprehensive coverage of mental health and addiction, and thrusting the state into the generic drug-making business.

News

Delayed census could greatly affect CA redistricting

A Census worker canvassing a neighborhood. (Photo: Wayne Via, Shutterstock)

Pushing back the census deadlines could have a profound political impact on California, ultimately forcing the state to draw scores of political districts for the 2022 elections within a tiny, two-week window. The Trump administration’s plan, announced earlier by Census Bureau Director Steven Dillingham, calls for a 120-day  delay in developing and reporting the finished data.

News

CA120: The math of the March primary

(Vintage engraving of a donkey, modified by Tim Foster, Capitol Weekly)

As we barrel toward the March 3 primary election, most eyes are on national and statewide polls showing a tight contest between four top contenders, with the latest Capitol Weekly polling showing Senator Bernie Sanders with a slight lead over Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Vice President Joe Biden, followed by Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of Southbend, Ind.

News

CA tracking poll: Sanders leading; Warren, Biden close behind

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders walking in the Independence Day parade with supporters in Ames, Iowa. (Photo by Gage Skidmore, Flickr

California’s likely voters increasingly support  Sen. Bernie Sanders in the March 3 Democratic presidential primary,  with Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former Vice President Joe Biden following closely, according to Capitol Weekly’s January tracking poll. Sanders, who is capturing strong support from Latinos, has taken the lead in our survey for the first time since we began polling the Democratic field in September.

Opinion

Don’t let the Golden State go dark

Transmission tower with power lines surrounded by trees. <(Photo: Pictures_n_Photos, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: The devastation of fire season in wine country and southern California has only been compounded by never-ending public safety power shutoffs across the state. While the purpose of power shutoffs by utility companies, like PG&E, is to prevent their uninspected equipment from catching fire during hot, windy weather, the constant lack of power is an unacceptable solution for California homeowners and business owners and their operations. 

Analysis

CA120: Local redistricting comes into the daylight

Some of the district boundaries of Los Angeles City Council seats. (Image: City of Los Angeles)

California has become a model for non-partisan, transparent, open and fair redistricting. The state commission’s focus on legitimate redistricting practices — like enforcing the Voting Rights Act, preserving communities of interest, reducing any splitting of cities and counties, even drawing lines without regard to partisanship or incumbency — have earned praise among policymakers and researchers around the country. 

News

Californians divided over housing solutions

An aerial view of a San Luis Obispo neighborhood. (Photo: Sundry Photography, via Shutterstock)

The latest Berkeley IGS Poll finds a lack of consensus among Californians on a number of policy proposals relating to housing. But one issue that voters do agree on, at least in concept, is that limits should be imposed on new housing development in high-risk wildfire areas. Three in four voters statewide (74%) support this policy, while just 25% are opposed.

News

Early balloting for state candidates, props

Voters at a political rally in Santa Monica during the 2016 election campaign. (Photo: Joseph Sohm)

A Capitol Weekly survey of California’s early vote-by-mail balloting shows Democrats Gavin Newsom and Dianne Feinstein ahead by double-digit margins in their races for governor and U.S. Senate, respectively. Regarding three of California’s most controversial ballot propositions, the most closely divided was Proposition 6, which would repeal the state’s newly imposed fuel tax: 42 percent opposed the repeal, 38 percent favored it.

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