Posts Tagged: participation

News

California’s 2018 midterm election: A dive into the numbers

A 2018 political rally at San Francisco City Hall. (Photo: Sheila Fitzgerald, via Shutterstock)

Voter participation dramatically increased in California in the 2018 midterm elections, part of a nationwide trend. About 51.9% of California’s 25.1 million eligible voters hit the polls in the 2018 general election, up from 36.6% in 2014, the previous midterm election, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Opinion

‘Company unions’ deepen post-Janus threat to labor

A union supporter carries the California flag at a rally in Capitol Park. (Photo: Karin Hildebrand Lau, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: You’d be hard pressed to find a more challenging threat to America’s labor movement than the Supreme Court’s recent Janus decision—which overturned 40 years of established legal precedent and the laws of 23 states in forcing public sector unions to represent non-members for free.

Opinion

Community college funding: Put students first

The entrance to Pasadena Community College. (Photo: Angel DiBilio, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: A certain (now disgraced) writer-producer-director is credited with saying, “80 percent of success is just showing up.” That would be nice, right? But for many of us, this just doesn’t hold true. Showing up to a job interview doesn’t get us 80 percent of the way to the job. Showing up to college doesn’t get us 80 percent of the way into the class we want.

News

CA120: Will those new 2016 voters return for the midterms?

A March 2016 rally in Los Angeles for Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders. (Photo: Joseph Sohm)

History tells us that presidential-year new voters are likely to skip mid-term elections. Will the new voters of 2016 be any different? The answer to that question could have a profound impact on the 2018 elections.

News

CA120: The lowdown on California’s election

An illustration of California's flag. (Lukasz Stefanski, Shutterstock)

Immediately after the 2016 there were a number of people and organizations that made quick analyses of the electorate, and what happened. Here in California, we appeared to be bucking a national trend: While the Republican ticket over performed in key swing states on the East Coast and upper mid-west, California saw Democrats regain legislative super-majorities in both houses, hold swing congressional seats and make Republicans appear more vulnerable than they have in many years.

Opinion

CA election data: People of color at disadvantage

A Californian casts a ballot. (Photo: Vepar5 via Shutterstock)

OPINION: All the votes from the June primary elections are finally counted. We now have the second highest number of votes—more than 8.5 million—ever cast in a California statewide primary. While this is good news for our communities and for the state, we have a lot more work to do when it comes to ensuring that more Californians have a say in the political process.

News

Senate eyes human egg business

A high-resolution image of human egg cells. (Jezper, via Shutterstock)

If you are interested in the buying and selling of human eggs, you might want to take in a California legislative hearing tomorrow in Sacramento. Up for action in the state Senate Health Committee is a measure that would permit paying women who provide the eggs if they do so for the purposes of research.

News

A note to our readers

Capitol Weekly and the CA120 series have been exploring the use of original polling to review the presidential race and the U.S. Senate contest. We are providing data-driven stories on how California voters are engaging with the election.

News

Hey, voters: Watch the Birdee

For the next six months, California voters will be bombarded with election images. Among the sinister attack-ad voice-overs and the political arguments engulfing social media, voters may catch a glimpse of ”Birdee,” a plump, twinkly eyed red bird, one of several animated characters in California’s political wars.

News

California voters: The ‘haves’ and the ‘have-nots’

Latinos taking the Pledge of Allegiance in Los Angeles. (Photo: Spirit of America)

Only half of California adults can be expected to vote in this year’s presidential election, and they are likely to be very different from those who do not vote—in their demographic and economic backgrounds and in their political attitudes. These are among the key findings of a report released Tuesday evening by the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC).

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