Posts Tagged: medical

News

Thumbs down on medical marijuana bureau

A dispensary's sign on Ventura Boulevard in the San Fernando Valley. (Photo: Laurie Avocado)

Amid a last-minute flurry of hostile amendments and despite backing from some in law enforcement and the cannabis industry, an attempt to set up the state’s first Bureau of Medical Marijuana has been defeated in the Assembly. The action by the Assembly Appropriations Committee followed intense negotiations between lawmakers, marijuana advocates and law enforcement.

News

Cash gathers over Proposition 46

A male patient uses a walker frame. Photo: Bikeriderlondon, via Shutterstock

It’s on the ballot but off the public’s radar, and months before Election Day the campaign cash already is piling up — $44 million and counting — for what is certain to be a massive TV blitz in the fall between doctors, lawyers and insurers.

News

Indigenous farm workers have scant access to mental health services

Irene Gomez, manager of a domestic violence and mental health outreach program for indigenous farmworkers in Oxnard, helps a client. (Photo: Scott Erickson.)

Although many counties have programs that provide at least some medical care to this population, access to mental health services is extremely limited in most parts of the state. This is despite the fact that indigenous farmworkers are believed to face higher amounts of anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder than the general population.

Opinion

One immigrant’s quest to become a doctor

Last year, 7,308 students applied to The University of California at San Francisco medical school; 149 were accepted. But only one student in next year’s class is undocumented. That’s me. It’s the first time UCSF has ever accepted an undocumented student.

News

Odd alliance on medical marijuana: Cops, activists

A dispensary's sign on Ventura Boulevard in the San Fernando Valley. (Photo: Laurie Avocado)

An unlikely relationship is forming between medical marijuana advocates and local peace officers. Traditionally, they have been in conflict,, but they are coming together to resolve one logistical aspect of the unregulated cannabis industry in California that deals with patient confiscation rights and evidence holding.

News

MICRA battle heads to ballot

Election 2014: California voters will decide in November whether to raise the decades-old $250,000 cap on pain and suffering damages in medical malpractice lawsuits. The ballot initiative, which also calls for drug and alcohol testing for doctors, will join four other measures that already have qualified for the ballot.

News

Lawyers, docs, insurers battle over MICRA — again

Medical personnel attend to a patient prior to surgery at USC Medical Center.

It’s not even on the ballot yet, but rival forces are gathering – again — over a plan to lift the decades-old cap on pain and suffering damages in medical malpractice cases. The proposal, aimed at the November ballot, also cracks down on drug- and alcohol-impaired physicians and seeks to curb over-prescribing of medications. (Above: USC Medical Center. US Navy photo)

News

Vaccination effort, ‘religious exemption’ at odds

Regulations implementing a new California law aimed at reducing the number of unvaccinated youngsters attending school may do just the opposite. A 2012 bill, which took effect Jan. 1, requires parents seeking an exemption from vaccinations against diseases like measles and whooping cough, to first talk with a health care provider about the risks and benefits of vaccines.

Opinion

Hospitals: Crucial players in health care reform

OPINION The importance of health care access to underserved populations is clear. Today, those local health needs are identified and prioritized in collaboration with local governments, nonprofit hospitals and community members. These “community benefit plans” provide the framework for local hospitals to direct available resources to target local health care needs in the community.

News

The paramedic will see you now

A day in the life of a typical paramedic is nothing like that of a primary care provider. Though both are central to the healthcare system, a paramedic performs in a high-stress environment that focuses exclusively on providing emergency medical services, while a primary care physician is more focused on a patient’s long term needs.

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