Posts Tagged: Capitol

News

Capitol rebuild in flux; foes battle Legislature over preservation

The state Capitol in Sacramento surrounded by Capitol Park. (Photo: Merge Digital Media LLC, via Shutterstock)

Preservationists understand that their appeal court victory this month will only delay a billion-dollar expansion of the state Capitol building, but they hope legislators will use the time-out to consider alternatives that would kill fewer trees, cost less money and keep Capitol Park more or less as generations of Californians have known and enjoyed it.

News

Dolores Huerta , a civil rights legend, continues the fight

Dolores Huerta spoke Tuesday at a meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative. (Photo: Julia Kikhinson, AP)

At age 92, civil rights icon Dolores Huerta maintains a busy schedule supporting the causes she has worked for her whole life. She speaks regularly all over the state, recently participated in a re-creation of the famed 1966 farm workers march from Delano to Sacramento, and is campaigning for Texas gubernatorial candidate Beto O’Rourke.

News

It’s a wrap: Nuke power, care for the mentally ill, abortion rights

Lobbyists crowd around video screen to watch the floor votes on the last night of the Legislature's session. (Photo: Rich Pedroncelli, AP)

The final curtain fell early Thursday on a legislative session that coursed through a pandemic, bolstered reproductive rights, saw a speaker nearly dispatched by his own caucus and drew the national spotlight to a governor who had survived an effort to recall him from office.

News

Richard Pan, strong backer of vaccinations, to leave Legislature

Sen. Richard Pan delivers remarks on the Senate floor. (Photo: Rich Pedroncelli, AP)

A California lawmaker who rose to national prominence by muscling through some of the country’s strongest vaccination laws is leaving the state Legislature later this year after a momentous tenure that made him a top target of the boisterous and burgeoning anti-vaccination movement.

Analysis

Bitterness over speakership fray permeates the Assembly

Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon. (Photo: Rendon's Twitter feed.)

Timing is crucial in politics, and the battle over the Assembly speakership is no exception. The clock is ticking. If Rendon continues through the end of the current two-year session, then any change in the speakership will be decided in the next session, following the November elections, when all 80 Assembly seats are up for election.

News

Capitol staffers tell job gripes and slam bad bosses — anonymously

Night view of California's Capitol in Sacramento. (Photo: Kit Leong, via Shutterstock)

Inspired by their union-yearning congressional counterparts, state Capitol employees have taken to social media with anonymous posts about bad bosses and a percolating desire for the same bargaining rights enjoyed by other state workers. The Instagram account, “DearCaStaffers,” had about 2,700 followers by Thursday. That was 400 more than the day before.

Opinion

Looking back: Room 1190 during the Schwarzenegger years

Room 1190 on the ground floor of the Capitol annex, looking towards the rear from the stage. (Photo: KQED.org)

OPINION:Cage matches between the media and elected officials have become an expected part of the current, vitriolic political ecosystem. But I recall a time when California government worked smoothly with the “fourth estate” to drive good policy, inform residents and have some pizazz while doing so.

Analysis

So you want to run for re-election? Here’s a short primer

The California state Capitol at dusk. (Photo: Karin Hildebrand Lau, via Shutterstock)

You are an incumbent officeholder. You’d like to keep on being an incumbent officeholder. That means a re-election campaign – you know, where you kowtow to special interests, rail against fraud and waste and, above all, avoid being called “one of those Sacramento politicians” — even if you are one of those Sacramento politicians.

News

Remembering Scott Lay, 1972-2021

Scott Lay (Photo: John Howard)

In the months after California voters removed Gray Davis from office, I would roll out of bed at 5:30 a.m. and log on to find a document waiting for me. It was from Scott Lay. The document was the rough draft of that morning’s edition of The Roundup, a daily email digest of California political news and information that went to nearly 10,000 subscribers.

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