Posts Tagged: systems

Opinion

Specialized training crucial for battery energy storage

An array of electrical storage batteries flanked by solar and wind energy devices. (Photo: petrmalinak, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: As a former member of the Contractors State License Board (CSLB), and a licensed C-10 electrical contractor with more than 57 years in the industry, the importance of proper training and expertise necessary to protect the safety of workers, our customers and their properties cannot be overstated.

Opinion

Needed now: safe drinking water for all Californians

Water streams from a hose in Scotts Valley during the 2021 drought. (Photo: Michael Barajas, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: While nobody disputes that everyone should have safe, clean drinking water, not every Californian does. According to the Public Policy Institute of California, more than 250 water systems serving 900,000 Californians were out of compliance with drinking water standards in 2020.

News

Construction, politics, secrecy clash in Capitol project

The state Capitol's East Annex. (Photo: State Department of General Services)

A fight is brewing in the Capitol – about the Capitol. It’s all about plans to build a new Visitors Center beneath the domed West Wing and demolish the 68-year-old East Annex, replacing it with one of three proposed buildings.

News

Shortage developing in California of educated workers

An interior view of one of the rooms of the Spacecraft Fabrication Facility of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. (Photo: Sundry Photography, via Shutterstock)

California faces an increasing demand for affordable higher education and a need for adequate facilities suited to a rapidly evolving economy. PPIC estimates that by 2030 the supply of college graduates will fall 1.1 million short of workforce demand. All three public systems—UC, CSU, and CCC—are working to bridge that gap.

Opinion

Water and the public health crisis

A water pathway in California's Central Valley. (Photo: Straight 8 Photography)

OPINION: Many Californians know of the lead poisoning in the public water system in Detroit.  Very few know of the contaminated water crisis impacting more than 1 million Californians. After years of trying to resolve the failure of the State of California to address this public health challenge, advocates have reached a historic negotiated agreement.

Opinion

Balancing regulation with innovation

OPINION: As the Legislature hurries to complete its final month of work for the year, the Capitol is humming with activity as legislators present and vote on hundreds of bills, advancing them to the governor’s desk. In the case of each bill, the Legislature’s responsibility is the same: To carefully consider its policy merits and its long-term impacts on regular Californians, our economy and our state’s future.

Opinion

For democracy’s sake, fix our voting infrastructure

Voters in Ventura County cast ballots during a recent election. (Photo: Spirit of America, Shutterstock)

OPINION: The administrative procedures, technology systems and people who manage elections are the essential elements of self-governance – the distribution of ballots and information, the collecting, the counting, the reporting. Like much of our public infrastructure, these systems are not always adequately maintained or updated, until they make headlines themselves.

News

Disabled face high hurdles for health care

A man in a wheelchair prepares for his daily constitutional. (Photo: Vadim Ratnikov)

Yvette Baptiste’s son Andrew was born with Klippel-Feil syndrome, a bone disorder where the neck vertebrae are fused, causing pain and limiting movement. But even though Baptiste, as the Executive Director of Eastern Los Angeles Family Resource Center, was a seasoned health advocate, it still took more than a year to find a new doctor to treat her adult son.

Opinion

UC, CSU: Eligible students deserve a chance

Students at a graduation ceremony at Santa Monica City College. (Photo: American Spirit, via Shutterstock)

California’s universities receive more and more applications every year. Last year there were a record 193,873 applicants to the University of California and 290,473 to the California State University system. Each applicant applied, on average, to two or three campuses. But just as this demand is growing, more and more eligible students are being turned away from California’s universities.

News

Health care reform: A functional and humane marketplace

The Affordable Care Act not only drastically changes how health care is delivered but sharply alters the underpinnings of California’s economy. To get a deeper sense of health care reform’s impact on the Golden State, Capitol Weekly talked to Micah Weinberg, PhD, a senior policy advisor at the Bay Area Council and CEO of Healthy Systems Project, a health care consulting firm based in Sacramento.

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