Posts Tagged: students

News

Dolores Huerta , a civil rights legend, continues the fight

Dolores Huerta spoke Tuesday at a meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative. (Photo: Julia Kikhinson, AP)

At age 92, civil rights icon Dolores Huerta maintains a busy schedule supporting the causes she has worked for her whole life. She speaks regularly all over the state, recently participated in a re-creation of the famed 1966 farm workers march from Delano to Sacramento, and is campaigning for Texas gubernatorial candidate Beto O’Rourke.

Opinion

‘Greening’ schoolyards must be a state investment priority

A children's playground cloaked in greenery. (Photo: JameSit, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: From San Diego to Sacramento, the threat of rising temperatures to our youth continues to worsen. And as six million California public school students return to class this month, they’ll be walking onto schoolyards covered with asphalt – prison-like, unhealthy environments that are detrimental to a kid’s physical, mental and educational health.

From San Diego to Sacramento, the threat of rising temperatures to our youth continues to worsen. And as six million California public school students return to class this month, they’ll be walking onto schoolyards covered with asphalt – prison-like, unhealthy environments that are detrimental to a kid’s physical, mental and educational health.

Opinion

A crucial effort to expand home internet access

Students accessing broadband from a computer lab. (Photo: J. Lekavicius, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Students all know the pains – dropped Zoom calls, spotty reception and failed downloads. COVID-19 has changed college campuses forever, expanding the classroom to wherever we can connect to the internet. While the transition has opened more access for students, it also  leaves behind many, including the 3.5 million Californians who do not have internet access at home.

Opinion

A math professor’s effort to dismantle remedial classes

An instructor in a college math class prepares to call on a student. (Photo: Juice Dash, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: I helped create these remedial structures because I believed they would help students be successful. But over the last decade I’ve worked to dismantle them, eliminating both remedial courses and placement tests. Why? Because enrolling in a remedial class makes students less – not more – likely to be successful in college.

Opinion

For education, adults should have financial aid opportunities, too

An older student online, reviewing tests and instructional materials. (Photo: Milan Ilic, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: It’s been my dream to earn my MBA and this year, I did it. During my journey, I learned there are millions of people who don’t follow a traditional path to college after high school and want to return to school as an adult, but face too many barriers such as high costs, limited availability, and scheduling restrictions at brick-and-mortar schools.

News

Governor’s budget good for higher education — mostly

UCLA students at graduation ceremonies.(Photo: Joseph Sohm, via Shutterstock)

Times are flush in the Golden State, fiscally speaking. With a total budget surplus of $97.5 billion, Gov. Gavin Newsom’s May budget revision prioritizes the funding of higher education. Just ask Chancellor Eloy Ortiz Oakley, who helms the California Community Colleges.

Recent News

California, shockingly, has the lowest literacy rate of any state

A volunteer teacher reads to a group of young children. (Photo: Monkey Business Images, via Shutterstock)

Decades of underinvestment in schools, culture battles over bilingual education, and dizzying levels of income inequality have pushed California to the bottom of the pile, making it the least literate state in the nation. Nearly 1 in 4 people over the age of 15 lack the skills to decipher the words in this sentence. Only 77 percent of adults are considered mid to highly literate, according to the nonpartisan data crunchers at World Population Review.

Opinion

Wanted: More funding for higher education

Students near the Powell Library on the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles. (Photo: David A. Litman, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: It has often been said that a budget is not just a series of numbers, but a reflection of our values. As products of California’s public higher education system, we applaud Gov. Gavin Newsom’s recently proposed budget that moves us closer to the values California outlined decades ago by making public higher education more accessible to students. But there is still work to be done.

News

After lengthy talks, strike looming at California College of the Arts

Students and an instructor at the California College of the Arts. (Photo: CommonApp)

Is labor strife the new normal in California higher education as 2021 ends? After UC sidestepped two worker strikes recently, 97 percent of staff at the California College of Arts (CCA) campuses in Oakland and San Francisco voted earlier this month to authorize their contract negotiating team to call a strike.

News

State gives $51 million to college students for stem cell research

Berkeley City College, which received a portion of $51 million in state stem cell research grants. (Photo: berkeleyside.org)

The California stem cell agency has awarded $51 million to help train students in the art of research at the Golden State’s community colleges and universities. All 15 applicants for awards that ran as high as $3.6 million each were approved, including Berkeley City College, which was initially rejected by anonymous reviewers who met privately prior to the ratification of their decisions by the agency’s directors.

Support for Capitol Weekly is Provided by: