Posts Tagged: San Jose

News

Pandemic: Some leaders’ behavior sends mixed messages

Beachgoers in April at Huntington Beach, despite stay-at-home orders. (Photo: Matt Gush, via Shutterstock)

California, like the rest of the nation, is seeing a dramatic rise in COVID infections and deaths — and Los Angeles County has some of the most dire statistics. Health officials reported more than 7,500 new cases in the county on Tuesday, shattering the old record, set last week.

Opinion

A chance to make high school testing more equitable

High school students taking a test. (Photo: LStockStudio, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Twenty-four states will use the SAT and/or ACT this school year for state assessments and accountability.  California students deserve the same opportunity to take these assessments for free at their schools and reap the benefit of increased access to higher education. 

Opinion

Manufactured homes — one option to ease the housing crisis

A manufactured home with a covered porch and vinyl siding. (Photo: Lindasj22, via Shutterstock)

It’s no secret that California is a very expensive place to live. California homes are being sold at two-and-half times the national average and rents are twice as much. Perhaps, there is no greater example that the dream of home ownership is dead than a taxpayer-financed housing project in San Jose.

News

Education: Tony Thurmond’s silver bullet

State Schools Superintendent Tony Thurmond at the Sacramento Press Club in September. (Photo: Rich Pedroncelli/Associated Press)

Abandoned by his father and orphaned at age 6 after the death of his mother to cancer, Tony Thurmond believes he could have easily ended up in prison. Instead, the 50-year-old Richmond resident is the new state superintendent of public education. He is the second African-American in the position after Wilson Riles, who served 1971-83.

Podcast

Capitol Weekly Podcast: Carmela Coyle

Carmela Coyle, president and CEO of the California Hospital Association. (Photo: Tim Foster)

Carmela Coyle, president and CEO of the California Hospital Association, sat down with Capitol Weekly’s John Howard and Tim Foster to talk about ways to cut health care costs, including a new experiment in Maryland that seeks to replace per-patient payments with a single annual payment designed to focus on keeping patients healthier.

News

Bullet train faces difficult journey

An artist's conception of the bullet train in operation. (Image, High Speed Rail Authority)

California’s bullet train may be in trouble again, as a recent court ruling and potential funding obstacles have plunged the transportation project into further uncertainty. The latest setbacks add to lingering questions over whether the $64 billion project can both meet its scheduled completion date and guarantee enough funding.

News

Appeals court allows pension cuts, backs San Diego

A view across the rail years of downtown San Diego. (Photo: Welcomia, via Shutterstock)

Calpensions: In another ruling allowing pension cuts, an appeals court last week overturned a state labor board ruling that a voter-approved San Diego pension reform was invalid because the city declined to bargain the issue with labor unions.

News

PolitiFact: Does Prop. 67 money go to environment?

A reusable green shopping bag with disposable plastic bags.(Photo: John Nightingale)

A ‘Yes’ vote on California’s Proposition 67 would ban thin plastic carryout bags at grocery and convenience stores statewide. The ban is supported by environmental groups that argue the bags choke wildlife and cause problems for recycling centers when they wrap around machinery.

News

Check it out: The state Democratic convention

A view of the main floor at the state Democratic Party convention in San Jose. (Photo: Alvin Chen/Capitol Weekly)

First, take 3,000 political junkies, mix in a few dozen ambitious politicians, stir thoroughly. Let simmer for three days and — Whee! — you have California’s Democratic Party Convention. It was an earnest carnival reflecting what makes California politics so much fun.

News

Reporter’s Notebook: Recalling Doug Willis

In this 1974 photo, AP reporter Doug Willis, left, talks with then-Gov. Ronald Reagan. (AP Photo)

Doug Willis, who for decades covered California politics for the Associated Press from his perch in Sacramento, was an amazing man – funny, balanced, sane, profoundly accurate, detail savvy and unflappable. He died Dec. 15 at the age of 77. He was my political mentor, friend and boss, hiring me in 1980 to come to Sacramento as news editor. I saw the move as a chance to report on state politics and learn from a master. I did both for 21 years.

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