Posts Tagged: republican

Recent News

CA120: Voter registration: The 2018 spike is not what it seems

Photo illustration of of highway alerting people tom coming elections. (Image: Jim Vallee, via Shutterstock)

Earlier this year, the state established a new system that could fundamentally change the relationship between Californians and their voter registration. In a series of changes—most notably the way that voter sign-ups are done at the Department of Motor Vehicles—California has entered an era of nearly automatic voter registration.

Recent News

California’s voter registration errors draw close look

A Department of Motor Vehicles building in Los Gatos. (Photo: Stellamc, via Shutterstock)

Errors in the new California Motor Voter registration system may undermine the credibility of elections, some worry. The state’s Department of Motor Vehicles announced early in September that it sent 23,000 voter registrations with errors to the secretary of state. This included mistakes in political party selections, vote-by-mail options and 3,000 registrations from people who had opted not to be registered.

News

June 5 primary: Voters head to the mail box

With California voters turning increasingly to the mail box to cast their ballots, five counties have set up an expanded vote-by-mail system for this year’s elections. Sacramento, Madera, Napa, Nevada and San Mateo are swapping out more than 500 neighborhood polling places and replacing them with nearly 80 high-tech “vote centers.”

News

Surfer Dana Rohrabacher faces the ‘blue wave’ — and more

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher at an April 26 news conference on medical cannabis reform. (Photo: Bill Clark, CQ Roll Call, via AP)

After 30 years in office, Orange County Republican Congressman Dana Rohrabacher is facing his toughest re-election. Rohrabacher, 70, is being challenged by more than a dozen people in the June primary, including his former ally, Republican Scott Baugh.

Recent News

Election 2018: Ted Gaines seeks tax board seat

Republican state Sen.Ted Gaines remembers the day when Democratic presidential contender Jimmy Carter visited Sacramento. As the 1976 presidential race heated up, Carter’s appearance offered a defining moment for the future legislator working as a Gerald Ford campaign volunteer.

Analysis

CA120: Political intrigue: BOE’s redistricting and the gas tax

Board of Equalization Chair Jerome Horton chats with colleague Diane Harkey in the Capitol. (Photo: AP/Rich Pedroncelli)

Whether you liked it or not, the state Board of Equalization successfully blocked a gas tax increase.  This saved Californians 4-cents-a-gallon at the pump, but handed Gov. Jerry Brown and lawmakers a $617 million hole in the state budget. What caused this rather dramatic policy move?  I keep being drawn to the extraordinary events surrounding the 2011 redistricting of the BOE, which has four directly elected members.

Podcast

Capitol Weekly Podcast: Wayne Johnson

Political consultant Wayne Johnson. (Photo: Tim Foster, Capitol Weekly)

Veteran political consultant Wayne Johnson, who has handled well over 200 campaigns in California, the U.S. and across the world, joins the Podcast this week to chat about politics and technology with Capitol Weekly’s John Howard and Tim Foster. Johnson, who handles mostly GOP candidates, is busy this year: He is working on Republican businessman John Cox’s gubernatorial campaign, which got a boost moments before we recorded the show when former Congressman Doug Ose abruptly exited the race.

News

CA120: Chasing the GOP vote

Republican candidates for governor -- Doug Ose, left, John Cox, center, and Travis Allen. (Illustration: Tim Foster)

The Republican side of the governor’s race has become an interesting contest to watch because, if for no other reason, of the way these candidates are trying to differentiate themselves before the June primary election. A debate in San Francisco led moderator John Diaz from the Chronicle to exclaim “This is the first time in San Francisco I have heard an argument among people about who most supports Donald Trump!”

Opinion

Political center key to immigration reform

Demonstrators protesting U.S. immigration policy at a Los Angeles rally. (Photo: Joseph Sohm)

OPINION: Our nation has procrastinated far too long on fixing our broken immigration system. What is needed is a solution that has support from the large and diverse political middle of America, represented by most members of the congress.

Analysis

CA120: Alabama election a wave — or just a ripple?

Democrat Doug Jones on election night in Alabama, declaring victory over Republican Roy Moore in the U.S. Senate special election. (Photo: Screen capture, CNBC)

ANALYSIS: Last week’s U.S. Senate election in Alabama marked for many political observers the first striking evidence that the coming year will bring a “wave election” which could wash Republican majorities out of Congress and trickle down to gubernatorial and legislative seats. It seems like a big turnaround based on just one election result.

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