Posts Tagged: practice

Opinion

Costly health care and pharmacy benefit managers

Drugs on a shelf for sale at a pharmacy. (Photo: i viewfinder, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: With the rising cost of health care at forefront of nearly every Californian’s mind, lawmakers in Sacramento are rightly considering a range of potential policy proposals to help rein in costs. In 2018, legislators took positive initial steps to regulate some of the egregious business practices of pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) – little-known middlemen in the health care system who have contributed to rising costs.

Opinion

Expand scope of care for nurse practitioners

A nurse with her young patient, and the patient's father. (Photo: Monkey Business Images, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: California is one of just 12 states that still excludes qualified nurse practitioners from taking a leading role in helping patients prevent and manage chronic disease like obesity, diabetes and hypertension. I believe this outdated model has deadly consequences for people in our community, where our specialized care for diabetes suffers for lack of qualified health care providers.

News

A ‘wave goodbye’ to Lawrence Karlton

Obit: In his three decades on the federal bench, Lawrence Karlton presided over many high-profile cases including several involving California’s troubled prison system. In 2009 he forced the overhaul of California’s prison health care system and ordered the state to reduce prison overcrowding.

News

Doctors win in dispute with nurses

A physician and a nurse tend to a patient. (Photo: Tyloer Olson, Shutterstock)

Here’s the diagnosis: It was the doctors versus the nurses, and the doctors won – for now. An effort to allow nurse practitioners limited authority to treat patients without the supervision of a doctor was blocked in the Assembly amid opposition from physicians, who said the plan would hinder high-quality medical care.

Opinion

Health coverage surge boosts need for anesthesia services

As more people enter the healthcare system and as baby boomers enter senior status there is increased demand for services, especially surgeries and outpatient procedures requiring anesthesia. Administering anesthesia has become even riskier and more difficult as patients with multiple medical problems have been able to live longer.

Opinion

Bicyclists: Helmets mean safer ride

Amateur bicyclists compete in the Garrett Lemire Memorial Grand Prix National Racing Circuit in Ojai, Calif. (Photo: American Spirit, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: As an avid bicyclist and an attorney who regularly works with clients who suffer traumatic brain injuries, I support Sen. Carol Liu’s vision that all cyclists wear helmets as a matter of safety. Recently, Sen. Liu introduced SB 192, which would mandate that all cyclists wear helmets as well as wear reflective clothing at night. Not only is this legislation personal (her nephew was killed by a drunk driver while he was riding) but she’s also able to back up her vision with statistics showing the need for helmets.

Opinion

Eye surgery: Training not a matter of politics, public opinion

OPINION: The Legislature had a critical opportunity to help increase access to medical services and reduce the wait times for patients who need ocular services. SB 492 would have allowed doctors of optometry to perform limited laser and minor procedures around the eye and freed up ophthalmologists to perform the complex surgical procedures only they are trained and educated to perform.

News

Battle for controller: A primary within a primary

Headquarters of the state controller, Sacramento. (Photo: Coolcaesar)

ELECTION 2014: California’s “top two“ primary system is creating an odd dynamic – a Democratic party primary within an open primary. In the race for state controller, the top three candidates are Fresno Mayor Ashley Swearengin, a Republican, and Democrats Betty Yee and John Pérez. Yee is a member of the Board of Equalization and Pérez served as Assembly speaker.

News

State high court says qualified undocumented immigrants can practice law

The state Supreme Court ruled unanimously Thursday that California’s undocumented immigrants are eligible to practice law if they meet licensing requirements — even though they are not citizens. The court’s decision involved Sergio C. Garcia, an undocumented immigrant from Chico who passed all qualifying state exams and was seeking a license to practice law in California. Arguments in the case were heard last year.

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