Posts Tagged: . number

News

California tax revenue ‘windfall’ now uncertain

The state Capitol in Sacramento, the seat of California government. (Photo: Always Wanderlust, via Shutterstock)

That $26 billion dollar “windfall” that California lawmakers learned about last month may not withstand a second round of economy-squelching lockdowns, and the risk of losing what little leverage they have is a top concern for state budget writers.

News

Thurmond leading Tuck in close race for state schools chief

Information in many languages outside a California voting place. (Photo: Underawesternsky, via Shutterstock)

As California counties continue to process mail-in and provisional ballots, Assemblyman Tony Thurmond, D-Richmond, has taken a substantial lead over Marshall Tuck in the race for California’s state superintendent of public instruction.

Recent News

Capitol misconduct accusations gather momentum

On the ground floor of the rotunda in the state Capitol in Sacramento. (Photo: trekandshoot, via Shutterstock)

The seemingly endless series of sexual harassment accusations swirling through the Capitol carries implications beyond the fates of individual lawmakers. The fallout from all of it might even endanger — temporarily — the Democrats’ supermajority and reverse the Legislature’s recent surge in approval among California voters.

News

UC: Locals vs. the out-of-staters

UC students on the Berkeley campus during a spring open house known as Cal Day. (Photo: cdrin, via Shutterstock)

It’s a common story. California high school graduates with top grades and scores still aren’t able to get into the University of California campus of their choice. Assemblyman Kevin McCarty, D-Sacramento, says he hears that complaint from constituents “all the time – at Trader Joe’s, at soccer fields and walking down the street.”

Analysis

Capitol action, by the numbers

The State Capitol in Sacramento, looking toward the West Steps on N Street. (Photo: Timothy Boomer)

As the California Legislature commences its 2017 Session, the following is a quick look back at historical numbers for bill introductions and gubernatorial bill actions. Over the last half a dozen years, as a general rule, the Legislature has introduced about 2,100 bills per year, about 1,000 of those measures get to the Governor’s Desk, and he signs roughly 850 of those bills.

News

Stem cell: $150 million public-private partnership

A high-resolution image of human egg cells. (Jezper, via Shutterstock)

California’s plan to create an ambitious, $150 million public/private partnership to commercialize state-funded stem cell research edged forward this week as the deadline for applications closed on Monday afternoon. Little is known about the nature of the applications — not even the number received.

Analysis

PolitiFact: Kamala Harris and veterans’ suicides

PolitiFact's Truth-o-Meter

In her campaign for U.S. Senate, California Attorney General Kamala Harris has pledged to “clean up” the scandals and reduce wait times at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The issue, Harris has said, is a matter of life and death.

News

Politico sets sights on Sacramento

A screen-capture image from Politico's Twitter feed.

Politico, a Washington, D.C.-based news outlet, plans to expand its California presence by adding 34 full-time employees by the end of next year and an additional seven by 2020, according to state business officials.

Analysis

Poll: Bernie up with independents, but Hillary still holds sway

California supporters of Bernie Sanders attend a rally. (Photo: Joseph Sohm)

CA120: Sanders has been stronger in states like California with “open” primaries — those that allow non-Democrats voters to cast a ballot. California Democrats allow voters not registered with any other political party to vote in their primary. But the question is this: In what numbers will these non-partisans vote? Can Sanders surf this wave of support to a victory in California? The answer, according to our data, is probably not.

Opinion

The reality of Spanish-language political ads

Demonstrators in Los Angeles advocating for less restrictive immigration laws. (Photo: Joseph Sohm)

OPINION: A lot of well-meaning, smart and politically savvy professionals cringe at the idea of putting together Spanish language advertisements. In seminars and forums they twist in circles trying to convince the audience and themselves that Hispanics can be easily reached in English. While the reasons may vary, in reality these are just excuses to mask an underlying concern: the fear of screwing up.

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