Posts Tagged: middle-class

Opinion

Now, more than ever, a strong labor movement is needed

Construction workers on the job in Mountain View. (Photo: Sundry Photography, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: For many, Labor Day means a day off work and one last summer BBQ. But without a strong labor movement, our country wouldn’t have weekends at all, let alone long ones. Unfortunately, union membership has fallen by half over the last 40 years, often as a result of state “right to work” laws.

Opinion

Affordable housing crisis haunts the middle class, too

A mother and her teen daughters looking at townhomes in Vista. (Photo: Simone Hogan, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: The COVID-19 pandemic has underscored just how many Californians are living only a paycheck away from eviction or foreclosure. Thousands of Californians have fallen behind on their rents and mortgages as joblessness skyrocketed – with the Legislative Analyst’s Office estimating that even with unprecedented government assistance, Californians owed $400 million in unpaid rent in 2020.

Opinion

Working families push for change

Labor union supporters rally at the state Capitol. (Photo: Karin Hildebrand Lau, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: If history has taught us anything, it’s that elections are less about choices in partisan ideology than they are about the real world impact that policies have on the lives of everyday people. In 2018, Americans overwhelmingly turned away from Republican politicians.

Opinion

Clippers arena: A great opportunity for Inglewood

A roadside sign for the city of Inglewood near Los Angeles. The picture was taken in April. (Photo: Albert Campbell)

The California economy is booming at a record pace.  The State’s unemployment rate is at a historic low of 4.2 percent, with investments in technology, health care, transportation and construction projects helping lead the way. But the Golden State’s success has been uneven.The economic wave of prosperity missed some of California’s most vulnerable populations, leaving some of the most diverse and socio-economically disadvantaged communities behind. The City of Inglewood is one of those communities. 

Opinion

Builders, contractors: Numbers tell the tale

Workers on a large construction project in Laguna Niguel. (Photo: Steve Bruckmann)

OPINION: Associated Builders and Contractors Northern California President Michele Daugherty’s misleading Jan. 3 op-ed article in the Capitol Weekly is drastically in need of an insertion of some true facts. Daugherty bitterly complained about a bill that expanded a successful, state-approved pre-apprenticeship program. She also stated in the article that she has “many reasons to be proud” of her organization’s 1,200 members, a number that gives her a market share of only 0.425 percent of the 282,063 licensed contractors in the state of California.

News

Latino economics, political clout linked

A portion of the hundreds of thousands of people who protested federal immigration policies in Los Angeles in 2006. (Photo: Joseph Sohm)

California’s growing Latino population is numerically strong but traditionally under-performs at election time – and that may have as much to do with economics as with politics. “The bottom line: If you see a growing Latino middle class, you will see a growing Latino representation in government,” said Mike Madrid, a veteran political strategist and author of a study by the newly formed California Latino Economic Institute.

News

Poor caught in dispute over Medi-Cal reimbursements

Consumers have been complaining this year that Covered California insurance plans have doctor’s networks that are too narrow. The doctors they want to see don’t accept the insurance, they say. While a relatively new problem for California’s upper- and middle-class residents, this situation has been a problem for the poor for decades.

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