Posts Tagged: families

Opinion

Wanted: Secure email in all state prisons

Closeup of a woman's hands using a computer keyboard to compose email. (Image: Nata Fuangkaew, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: For incarcerated Californians, the ability to communicate with loved ones on the outside can be a literal lifeline, helping them survive their time in prison and preparing for successful reintegration into society after their release. Five correctional facilities in our state – including California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility in Corcoran where my fiancé, Michael, was incarcerated – now offer access to secure email. 

Opinion

Alzheimer’s funding just first step to aid aging population

A 77-year-old man running uphill in a road race at Daggett Pass, Nevada. (Photo: Karin Hildebrand Lau)

OPINION: By including $3 million in annual funding for Alzheimer’s research in the budget, Gov. Gavin Newsom showed he is willing to take action on issues important to California’s fast-growing aging population. Still, the move is only the beginning of what must be a much larger effort to keep pace with our older population’s future needs.

Opinion

Clemency for the condemned? Remember the victims

The execution chamber at San Quentin State Prison. (Photo: Wikipedia)

OPINION: Democrats ask that as California Gov. Jerry Brown leaves office he provide mercy to California’s 739 death row inmates. The governor of California has the power to issue pardons, commute sentences or grant clemency to individuals convicted of crimes in the state.  The state Legislature does not review this power. 

Opinion

‘Public charge’ rule could hurt health care

Hundreds of people rally for improved health care in front of San Francisco City Hall, 2017. (Photo: Kim Wilson, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: In the national debate over immigration, one proposal threatens the health and well-being of every person living in this country. The proposed “public charge” rule would make it more difficult for legal immigrants to become permanent residents and prevent immigrants from using the programs their tax dollars help support, like Medicaid (Medi-Cal in California) or nutrition assistance.

Opinion

Hunger and the ‘public charge’ rule

A 3-year-old child with a cardboard sign. (Photo: Discha-AS, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Blanca was seven months pregnant when her husband’s sciatica rendered him unable to work. The pain in his back was so intense he couldn’t stand upright. They had no medical insurance and could not qualify for unemployment or disability. For months they survived off savings until there was nothing left. Their food budget dwindled to $2, “maybe $3, or sometimes nothing at all,”

Opinion

Pharmacy benefit managers ease seniors’ drug costs

A photo illustration of drug costs, with prescription medication atop a dollar bill. (Image: Video_Creative)

OPINION: The Golden Years for senior citizens across the Golden State are longer and more active than for the generations that preceded us. This is a real gift, but it does mean most of us are battling age-related medical conditions, often dealing with them for decades. Prescription drugs are a big part of our healthcare toolbox, and today, almost 40 percent of senior citizens use five or more medications.

Opinion

Voters can halt property tax ‘moving penalty’

A view of San Francisco's iconic row houses. (Photo: Natasha Kramskaya)

OPINION: California has long been a state that has made a priority of protecting seniors, people with disabilities and victims of natural disasters. Regardless of the challenge, Californians always rise up to support one another.

News

Cremation — an environmentally friendly approach

A wilted rose bouquet at the Miramar National Cemetery in San Diego. (Photo: Sherry V. Smith)

The environment plays a big part in Capitol legislation, but here’s a topic rarely linked to the environment – cremation. Traditional fire-based cremation entails emissions and pollutants. But a little-known bill signed by Gov. Brown allows the use of a water-based method called alkaline hydrolysis, which has been used elsewhere since the 19th century.

News

California slaps surcharges on some health care policies

Illustration: Logo of Covered California

California’s health exchange said Wednesday it has ordered insurers to add a surcharge to certain policies next year because the Trump administration has yet to commit to paying a key set of consumer subsidies under the Affordable Care Act. The decision to impose a 12.4 percent surcharge on silver-level health plans in 2018 means the total premium increase for them will average nearly 25 percent, according to Covered California.

Opinion

Struggling to make California affordable

A housing tract in San Jose, Calif. (Photo: PBK-PG, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: When California residents in the Bay Area making over $100,000 per year are considered “low income” and thereby eligible for government subsidies for housing, something is seriously wrong. The issue of affordability is hitting critical mass in regions throughout the state.

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