Posts Tagged: education

Opinion

Now, more than ever, affordable broadband access is crucial

A computer user searches for housing using bro0adband. (Photo: Tada Images. via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Even as the internet has kept us connected – there is more work to do to close the digital divide – especially for rural and low-income families. During this time of great disruption to our daily lives and dramatic shifts in behavior, our state’s broadband networks rose to the challenge despite unprecedented demand and network traffic.

Opinion

Lawmakers must give high priority to Alzheimer’s care

An elderly patient is comforted by a young caregiver. (Photo: Ocskay Mark, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Every year, the Alzheimer’s Association releases a report providing national and state-level statistics on Alzheimer’s prevalence, mortality, cost of care and impact on caregivers. As a son caring for my father who is living with Alzheimer’s, these statistics simply cannot do justice to the huge emotional, physical and financial toll that this disease takes on families and society at large.

Opinion

Digital divide hinders fair recovery from the pandemic

An illustration of cloud computer linkages over L.A. at night. (Photo: TierneyCJ, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: COVID-19 has tested our mettle and shined a light on long-held systematic deficiencies, forcing a re-prioritization of our “policy to-do list. “While the lack of equitable broadband accesshas served as a barrier to innovation, opportunity and connection among Californians for more than two decades, this inequity has caused more harm in one year of a pandemic than in the previous 25.

Podcast

Capitol Weekly Podcast: CTA President E. Toby Boyd

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented heretofore-unseen challenges to students and teachers who have suddenly found themselves the “guinea pigs” in a massive distance learning experiment. California Teachers Association President E. Toby Boyd joins Capitol Weekly’s Tim Foster and John Howard to give an update on expectations for the upcoming school year and discusses another big CTA priority: passing Prop. 15, the “Split Roll” initiative that would decouple large commercial properties from Prop. 13.

News

New push to expand ‘transitional kindergarten’ in California

A teacher and his students in a kindergarten class. (Photo: Monkey Business Images, via Shutterstock)

After a couple of failed attempts, a move to expand transitional kindergarten to all 4-year-olds in California is under way. Assembly members Kevin McCarty, Phil Ting and Eloise Gomez Reyes and state Sens. Susan Rubio, Lena Gonzalez, and Bill Dodd have introduced Assembly Bill 2500 to approve universal transitional kindergarten.

News

‘Public charge’ policy chills immigrants

A rally for immigrant rights in San Francisco. (Photo, Eddie Hernandez, via Shutterstock)

In two 5-4 decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court – one in late January, the other on Feb. 21 — the high court affirmed President Donald Trump’s effort to change long-standing  policy and punish immigrants who obtain public services by denying them green cards and a path to citizenship. The new policy directly affects a relatively small number of immigrants. But those who provide services to immigrants and those who advocate on their behalf say the change has a chilling effect on the  greater immigrant community

Opinion

The SAT is helping minorities succeed

Materials for preparing for the SATs on a shelf at a Laguna Niguel book store. (Photo: David Tonelson, via Shutterstock)

OPINION:As a proud first-generation American, I have a deep personal connection to the one thing that helps create opportunities for people from all backgrounds: education. When my parents immigrated to the U.S. from Colombia with limited financial resources, they understood the power that education has to change lives. Yet, the doors to my future were only truly opened when I took the PSAT/NMSQT, which helps students prepare for the SAT, qualifies them for National Merit Scholarships, and is connected with hundreds of colleges and many scholarship opportunities

News

An Assembly battle in the wide-open spaces

Assembly candidates Elizabeth Betancourt, left, and Megan Dahle. (Photo illustration by Tim Foster, Capitol Weekly)

A husband and wife team in the Legislature — again? On Nov. 5, voters in California’s sprawling 1st Assembly District will choose between Republican Megan Dahle and Democrat Elizabeth Betancourt in a special election.

Opinion

Key advantages of a private nursing education

Nursing students at a university health care facility. (Photo: Africa Studio, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Nursing is in my blood. My parents are both nurses. My sister, countless cousins and others in my family have all dedicated themselves to serving others through the noble profession of nursing. When I graduated high school, I briefly tried to outrun my destiny. I left Los Angeles to enroll at UC Merced, only to find that the call to nursing remained strong.

Opinion

Wanted: A comprehensive data system for education

Illustration depicting the examination of complex data. (Image: alphaspirit, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: It is easy to point to recent public investments that demonstrate the state’s commitment to improving educational and economic opportunity for Californians. But attempt to assess the outcomes of those efforts, and you will come up woefully short.

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