Posts Tagged: dialysis

News

Labor, industry tangle over dialysis ballot initiative

A dialysis machine at work. (Photo:Aleksandr Ivasenko, via Shutterstock)

Kidney dialysis may sound like an odd topic for a California ballot proposition, but voters will tangle with the issue on Nov. 3 — for the second time.The basic fight over Proposition 23 is between organized labor, which favors the initiative, and the dialysis clinic industry, which is opposed. Surrounding the debate are questions of medical care quality, clinic staffing, access, and costs.

Opinion

Prop. 8 won’t improve dialysis patients’ treatment

A dialysis patient during treatment. (Photo: Picsfive, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: I am the CEO of the National Kidney Foundation. I am a believer in this nearly 70-year-old organization that was started at the kitchen table of a mother desperately trying to save her child’s life. I 100 percent buy into our mission to be an advocate for all kidney patients and relentlessly fight for their quality of life, their treatments and their cure.

News

The ballot props: What’s at stake

A voter prepares to make a choice on the ballot. (Photo: Svanblar, via Shutterstock)

California voters are being asked to approve $16.4 billion in bond financing, cut taxes and weigh in on such diverse topics as kidney dialysis prices and farm animal living conditions in the Nov. 6 election. The 11 initiatives on the ballots include requests for bond financing for housing, water and children’s hospitals. Other initiatives would approve huge property tax savings for seniors, repeal the controversial gas tax hike and open the way to expand rent control. In the long tradition of California ballot propositions, fights over the initiatives have prompted record spending.

Opinion

All dialysis patients should have access to care

A nurse in a hospital renal unit starts dialysis treatment on a patient. (Photo: Tyler Olson)

OPINION: I first started having problems with my kidneys when I was 11-years-old.  By the time I was 20, I was on dialysis. I was able to keep my kidneys for a while, but as often happens with kidney disease, the illness eventually took over. Almost 40 years and three kidney transplants later, I have beaten the odds by staying alive, but only because of the dialysis treatment I receive every day.

Recent News

Dialysis dispute targets billing, health

A patient receiving blood dialysis treatment. (Photo: Khajornkiat Limsagul, via Shutterstock)

The Madera patient says he likes his Kaiser doctor and has no desire to switch to publicly funded Medicare, even though he qualifies. But if Senate Bill 1156 is approved, Adames likely wouldn’t get that choice. The bill would require that patients like him receiving third-party assistance would either need to enroll in Medicare or Medi-Cal (for those who are low income), or if they choose to stay on private insurance, they will only receive reimbursement at Medicare or Medi-Cal’s much lower rates.

Opinion

A case for charitable health care

A hospital patient is monitored during a dialysis session. (Photo: PicsFive, via Shutterstock)

If it becomes law, SB 1156 will harm some of California’s most at-risk residents—low-income, disproportionately minority dialysis and transplant patients who depend on charitable assistance to afford their health care.  More than 67,000 Californians depend on dialysis to stay alive, and many face serious financial hardship as a result of their medical condition.

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