Posts Tagged: customers

Opinion

Did an emergency text message keep our lights on? Yes and no

Wind-driven generators capture and deliver energy. (Photo: VG Foto, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: When Californians received an emergency text alert recently urging them to cut energy use, they probably didn’t know how much they were needed to avoid power outages. Electricity demand almost surpassed supply during a record heat wave worsened by climate change. And yet, unlike August 2020, outages never came.

News

Zero waste: A battle in California against wasteful packaging

A farmers' market in Oceanside, where a heavy emphasis is placed on recycling. (Photo: Dogora Sun, via Shutterstock)

In 2019, a Californian named Zuleyka Strasner created a sustainable grocery delivery startup called Zero Grocery. Previously an operations manager at a Bay Area venture capital firm, she got the idea for her low-waste grocery service after seeing a startling amount of plastic trash washing up on the tropical Nicaraguan beach where she’d honeymooned. 

Opinion

Time is now to expand Californians’ access to broadband

A high-speed electronic hookup carrying data via an ethernet connection. (Photo: Everything You Need, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: The past two years have made it abundantly clear that broadband is essential to 21st century living in California. Broadband has become vital for education, remote work, telehealth, entertainment and family connections. It’s necessary that we prioritize finding solutions to close the digital divide that will benefit rural and urban communities.

Opinion

Opposition brewing to Sacramento storm water tax

A warning sign blocks motorists from entering an area flooded by storm water. (Photo: Yorklass, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: We strongly suspect that readers of this column are stunned to see the authors’ names together as coauthors. One of us is a conservative taxpayer advocate and the other is a Democratic political consultant. What unites us is our opposition to the City of Sacramento’s proposed storm water tax. Here’s some background.

Opinion

App-based services helped California survive the pandemic

An app-user types out an order on his hand-held device. (Photo: Billion Photos, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: The economic devastation of the pandemic is well-chronicled. At its peak, more than two million Californians lost their jobs. In the wake of such devastation, a recent report found that app-based rideshare and food delivery platforms helped provide earnings for displaced or struggling workers, and helped keep many restaurants and retailers afloat.

Opinion

CA’s existing solar power system favors the wealthy

Solar energy units atop houses in Vista, in northern San Diego County. (Photo: Simone Hgan, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Over the past few weeks, we have seen an increase in activity and misinformation from opponents of AB 1139, California Solar Equity and Ratepayer Relief legislation, authored by Assemblymember Lorena Gonzalez (D-San Diego).

Analysis

In California, could 2021 be propane’s year?

Industrial propane tanks. (Photo: RazorbackAlum, via Shutterstock)

ANALYSIS: Among the numerous advocates for a wider range of lower-carbon options in the U.S. is one group who’ve not received much attention: the propane industry. Given the trends on propane usage and production, that may very well change in 2021. Propane advocates think that their fuel is not getting the kind of attention that it deserves from policy-makers, regulators, and environmental lobbyists.

Opinion

CPUC ‘yes’ vote could cut water bill surcharges for millions

Residential water sprinklers in action. (Photo: Fahroni, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: For over a decade, Californians have been dealing with unpredictable and confusing water surcharges. That could change if the state’s Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) votes to adopt a program recommended by the Public Advocates Office (Cal Advocates) as soon as Aug. 27.

Opinion

If CPUC eliminates ‘decoupling,’ water rates would rise

Sprinklers watering a field in Scotts Valley, Calif. (Photo: Michael Barajas, via Shutterstock)

As early as Aug. 6, the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) could vote to adopt a proposal that would eliminate a best-practice regulatory tool – known as decoupling – that currently removes the incentive of water suppliers to sell more water.

News

A major solar energy player leaves some customers seething

Illustration by Quentin Lueninghoener, FairWarning.

This sounds too good to be true, was one of Brenda Ortiz’s first thoughts when a salesman showed up at her front door in Riverside County in October 2018. He was with Vivint Solar, Ortiz recalled him saying, and was working with her local utility, Southern California Edison, to find people who qualified for free solar panels.

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