Posts Tagged: ballot measure

News

Ballot battle underway to keep stem cell agency alive

DNA is injected into a stem cell. (Photo: Spectral-Design, via Shuttertock)

The California stem cell agency has just finished pumping $5.3 million into the fight to save the lives of Covid-19 victims. And — in a ballot-box bonus — its efforts are already surfacing in the ballot campaign to rescue the agency from its own demise. The agency is running out of money. It will begin closing its doors this fall without major financial support that it hopes will come from Proposition 14, a $5.5 billion bond measure on the November ballot.

Opinion

March 3: Voters will decide on $15 billion for schools

Students at their graduation ceremonies at UCLA. (Photo: Joseph Sohm, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Voters may be surprised to find Proposition 13 on their March 3 ballot because they recall the 1978 vote on another Proposition 13. But be assured: This year’s Prop. 13 has nothing to do with the well-known tax-cutting measure and everything to do with the future of the state. Proposition 13 is the strongest statewide school bond measure in California history, providing $15 billion to make educational facilities safe for students.

News

Stem cell agency faces leadership challenge

Human embryonic stem cells. (Photo: California Institute for Regenerative Medicine)

California’s 12-year-old stem cell research effort is expected to give away tens of millions of dollars in public this week, but its most important matters — issues that deal with its survival and future — likely will be discussed behind closed doors at a meeting Thursday of its governing board. On the table is the leadership of the $3 billion organization, which is scheduled to run out of cash in just three years.

News

Stem cell agency founder eyes $5 billion in state funding

A human DNA complex. ((Illustration, Shutterstock)

The man often called the father of the California stem cell agency has all but said he is set to launch an effort to pump an additional $5 billion in state funding into the research effort, which is scheduled to run out of cash in about three years.

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