Posts Tagged: 2019

News

California’s water chief steps up to fight historic drought

Joaquin Esquivel at a water board meeting. (Photo: Water Education Foundation.)

As a native of the Coachella Valley near Palm Springs where it hardly ever rains, Joaquin Esquivel has always known that water is precious. His uncle often took him to the Salton Sea, and he had family served by a well. He carries that respect for the resource as chair of California’s State Water Resources Control Board.   “Growing up in the desert, you are very aware of water,” he said.

Opinion

A math professor’s effort to dismantle remedial classes

An instructor in a college math class prepares to call on a student. (Photo: Juice Dash, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: I helped create these remedial structures because I believed they would help students be successful. But over the last decade I’ve worked to dismantle them, eliminating both remedial courses and placement tests. Why? Because enrolling in a remedial class makes students less – not more – likely to be successful in college.

News

After lengthy talks, strike looming at California College of the Arts

Students and an instructor at the California College of the Arts. (Photo: CommonApp)

Is labor strife the new normal in California higher education as 2021 ends? After UC sidestepped two worker strikes recently, 97 percent of staff at the California College of Arts (CCA) campuses in Oakland and San Francisco voted earlier this month to authorize their contract negotiating team to call a strike.

News

Recall elections increasingly define political landscape

A newspaper's election gives readers information about the Sept. 14, 2021, recall election. (Photo: Matt Gush, via Shutterstock)

California’s attention was focused recently on the failed attempt to recall Gov. Newsom as a rare event of historical magnitude. In fact, recall elections happen all the time, and all but a relative handful of these obscure contests disappear into the limbo of history.

News

Poll: Death penalty repeal gaining, but many undecided

A correctional officer in Death Row at San Quentin Prison. ((Photo: California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation)

In its latest statewide survey, the Berkeley IGS Poll asked registered voters how they would vote such an amendment if the election were held today.  The results indicate that 44% of voters say they would vote Yes to repeal the state’s death penalty law, 35% would vote No to keep the law in force, while a relatively large proportion, 21%, are undecided.

Analysis

*An exodus from California? Actually, no

An artist's rendering of a California highway sign. (Image: gguy, via Shutterstock.)>

ANALYSIS: New research released by the nonpartisan California Policy Lab finds that contrary to suggestions about a mass exodus from California, most moves in 2020 happened within the state. Exits from California in 2020 largely mirrored historical patterns, while the biggest statewide change was a decrease in people moving into California.

News

CA120: DMV voter registrations hit slow lane

The DMV office in Los Gatos. (Photo: stellamc, via Shutterstock)

Digging into it, we can see that California has been experiencing at least one area with a lull in registration. Looking at the voter file and codes from the secretary of state on registration methods, we can see hundreds of thousands fewer DMV registrations than would be expected since the lock down began.

News

Lifting the veil on an e-cigarette company — sort of

An array of disposable e-cigarettes on display. (Photo: NguyeningMedia, via Shutterstock)

In recent months, mystery has surrounded the ownership of a controversial e-cigarette company that has reaped millions of dollars in sales of flavored, kid-friendly nicotine products by exploiting a loophole in federal regulations. 

News

California fights fires amid COVID-19 and a tight budget

A man watches the 2018 Woolsey fire in Los Angeles. (Photo: BrittanyNY, via Shutterstock)

Strapped California, facing an unprecedented budget crisis as it battles COVID-19, is setting aside hundreds of millions of dollars to confront wildfires. Already, more than 1,300 fires — mostly small — have been reported as the hottest, driest months of the year approach.

News

Outlook bleak for California’s 2019 fire season

A resident leads horses to safety in Paradise during the 2018 Camp Fire. (Photo: Dylan Mittag, via Shutterstock)

Everyone with any knowledge of the subject agrees: California is on the brink of a potentially disastrous fire season. And there is concern that the problem is not going to be solved soon. “Our best efforts may still be inadequate,” said Michael Picker, president of the California Public Utilities Commission.

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