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Personnel Profile: Addie Meyers

Addie Meyers is a legislative aide for Assemblyman Ted Lieu. She has worked at the Capitol for two years and is a promising young artist.

When did you first become interested in painting? Do you have a background in art?

I have been painting since I was really young, but everyone always told me that “Artists don’t make money until they die!” I hope to prove them wrong! I actually was kind of discouraged from pursuing art as an actual career. So, when I received a full ride softball scholarship to Alabama A& M University, my parents told me I had to major in something a little more promising, so I chose political science. Anyways, I have always painted for fun and for extra cash when needed. As for selling my work, I started out painting accents on furniture for my mom’s antique store when I was in high school. I then started doing murals in homes and stores. That continued through college. I painted for a store out in Alabama and I painted murals in a few children’s rooms when I was in school. The problem with murals is that it is not steady money, so you can’t count on it for work. I guess that is what inspired me to work for the state: The idea of safe, steady income and benefits is reassuring! I was also fairly interested in politics.

Tell me about your paintings.

I love to use bright colors and paint things as I see them. I tend to have an impressionistic style, and there is usually a surreal spin on a lot of my pieces. I mainly work with oils on canvas, and sometimes I use acrylic on metal. I also love to paint accents and murals in homes. It is always cool to add that last touch to someone’s place, and make it exactly what they want.
Is your art a hidden talent or have your co-workers at Assemblyman Lieu’s office always known?

I think they knew, but I wasn’t trying to make it known until the last month or so. I really was starting to miss painting, so I decided to try and get enough pieces together for a show. It really took off, and I felt really good about it. That is when they started to take notice.

How did you go about the process of getting your paintings displayed at Swanberg’s as part of the Second Saturday art walk?

I actually painted for Swanberg’s old store on 5th Avenue, and I also painted a mural in their kitchen at home. When they moved locations, they needed new paintings on the outside of the store on X Street. That was when Michelle Swanberg pressured me into doing Second Saturday. I am glad I did. It is a lot of fun, and I hope to get my work into a gallery really soon.

How much time do you spend painting?

I only spend about two hours at a time when painting. I have a short attention span, so when I get past a few hours on one piece I tend to ruin them.


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