Opinion

For Latino health, funding the LWCF is critical

Visitors at Dolores Park in San Francsico on Memorial Day, 2018. (Photo: FTiare, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Access to care is not the only problem the Latino Coalition is fighting to remedy. Another acute health inequity facing Latinos: woefully inadequate numbers of accessible outdoor activities and parks. With the already high rates of obesity, diabetes, hypertension and heart disease facing the community, opportunities for exercise and outdoor endeavors become all the more important.

Recent News

State’s stem cell funds dwindling

Embryonic stem cells observed in the laboratory. (Photo: Giovanni Cancemi, via Shutterstock)

The Golden State’s stem cell research program is down to its last $144 million after nearly 14 years of financing searches for therapies for everything ranging from diabetes to bubble baby syndrome. Funded with $3 billion in November 2004, California’s stem cell agency has yet to back a therapy that is widely available to the public.

Recent News

CalPERS president loses board seat to policeman

CalPERS headquarters, downtown Sacramento. (Photo: CalPERS)

The new CalPERS president, Priya Mathur, lost her board seat this week, defeated by a Corona police sergeant, Jason Perez, who wants to shift the $360 billion investment fund toward higher yields that secure pensions with less focus on social issues. Mathur, a Bay Area Rapid Transit District analyst serving on the board since 2002, rose to the leadership post in January.

Opinion

CARB’s bait-and-switch on climate change

A natural gas power plant near Ventura. (Photo: Richard Fitzer, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: When California’s signature climate change program was nearing its expiration date, there was serious debate about whether to extend it. This program, called Cap-and-Trade, reduces carbon emissions but it also increases the costs of gas, electricity, and numerous other necessities. That’s a significant problem in a state known for high taxes, onerous regulations, and the worst small business climate in the country.

Recent News

CA120: Voter registration: The 2018 spike is not what it seems

Photo illustration of of highway alerting people tom coming elections. (Image: Jim Vallee, via Shutterstock)

Earlier this year, the state established a new system that could fundamentally change the relationship between Californians and their voter registration. In a series of changes—most notably the way that voter sign-ups are done at the Department of Motor Vehicles—California has entered an era of nearly automatic voter registration.

Recent News

Stem cell: Feds’ crackdown could affect California

A stem cell researcher in the laboratory. (Photo: 18percentgrey, via Shutterstock)

The recent federal crackdown on the use of fetal tissue in scientific research could well be a harbinger of an effort to revive restrictions on the use of human embryonic stem cells, placing a roadblock in the way of creation of therapies to treat often deadly afflictions that affect millions of Americans. And it could have an impact on the fate of California’s $3 billion stem cell program, which expects to run out of money for new awards by the end of next year.

Opinion

Marina bears heavy burden in desalination dispute

Marina Beach north of Monterey, near the site of a planned desalination plant. (Photo: Marina Coast Water District)

In parched, drought-stricken California, where water is considered liquid gold, the politics of power and wealth are playing out in real-time. The California Public Utilities Commission’s (CPUC) recent decision to allow the California American Water Company (Cal-Am) to proceed with its Monterey Peninsula Water Supply Project desalination plant is great news – that is, if you live in Carmel, Pacific Grove or Monterey.

Recent News

California’s voter registration errors draw close look

A Department of Motor Vehicles building in Los Gatos. (Photo: Stellamc, via Shutterstock)

Errors in the new California Motor Voter registration system may undermine the credibility of elections, some worry. The state’s Department of Motor Vehicles announced early in September that it sent 23,000 voter registrations with errors to the secretary of state. This included mistakes in political party selections, vote-by-mail options and 3,000 registrations from people who had opted not to be registered.

Opinion

Truth-in-lending law needed now

A photo illustration using stacks of quarters to show rising interest rates. (Photo: Doubletree Studio)

Would you take out a loan for a new home if you didn’t know the interest rate? How about for a car? Or even for a credit card? More than likely, not.

News

FEMA and California wildfires: A report card

The sun appears red through a haze of wildfire smoke in California. (Photo: Neil Lockhart)

Nearly a year after the 2017 California wildfires hit the north and south state, the report card on FEMA—the Federal Emergency Management Agency—is in. The Sept. 4 analysis by the U.S. Government Accountability Office detailing FEMA’s performance credited FEMA with fulfilling its own disaster readiness goals, but says that wasn’t enough for the agency to be sufficiently prepared to deal with the horrific fires that engulfed parts of the state.

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