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No. 53: Capitol Weekly’s Top 100

Illustration by Chris Shary

53: Carmela Coyle

Carmela Coyle took over last year as the president and CEO of the California Hospital Association, a potent political force in health care politics. She replaced the retiring C. Duane Dauner, who ran the CHA staff for decades. The association represents more than 400 hospitals and health systems in California. Coyle led the

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No. 63: Capitol Weekly’s Top 100

Illustration by Chris Shary

63: David Townsend

For more than 35 years, David Townsend has been a fixture on the Capitol scene, managing initiative campaigns and advising associations, candidates and corporations on the ins and outs of political decision-making. He founded Townsend Raimundo Besler & Usher, one of Sacramento’s best-known political consulting firms, and now he’s got a new gig

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No. 49: Capitol Weekly’s Top 100

Illustration by Chris Shary

49. Diane Griffiths

Diane Griffiths, a well-liked Capitol veteran, has moved over to Senate Leader Toni Atkins’ team as a top adviser, one of a series of personnel changes involving the Senate leadership. Atkins replaced Kevin de León, who is running for the U.S. Senate. Griffiths, worked for Sen. Bob Hertzberg and retired in June 2017,

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No. 48: Capitol Weekly’s Top 100

Illustration by Chris Shary

48: Alastair Mactaggart

Alastair Mactaggart is the latest addition to a developing California political phenomenon — the idealistic multimillionaire. Tom Steyer and Charles Munger Jr. are earlier versions, with widely differing viewpoints on public policy. Mactaggart broke into the headlines earlier this year as the $3.5 million backer of a proposed state ballot initiative aimed at

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No. 66: Capitol Weekly’s Top 100

Illustration by Chris Shary

66. Andrew Antwih

Lobbyist Andrew Antwih does a bit of everything, but he is perhaps best known for his work on transportation issues. During a 12-year stint in the Capitol, he served eight years as chief consultant to the Assembly Transportation Committee. He’s a partner in Shaw Yoder Antwih, which handles a numerous local governments, including

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No. 23: Capitol Weekly’s Top 100

Illustration by Chris Shary

23. Evan Westrup

Press Secretary Evan Westrup has handled Gov. Jerry Brown’s press chores for a decade, first in the state attorney general’s office, then in Brown’s last two campaigns for governor and now in the governor’s official office. He is one of a very few on the daily “morning call” with the governor when

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No. 50: Capitol Weekly’s Top 100

Illustration by Chris Shary

50: Adama Iwu

The topic of sexual harassment dominated the winter at the capitol following the Los Angeles Times’ publication of an open letter demanding an end to the persistent harassment endured by staffers, lobbyists and even elected officials. Assemblymen Raul Bocanegra and Matt Dababneh resigned, and Sen. Tony Mendoza lost his committee chairmanship in

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No. 100: Capitol Weekly’s Top 100

Illustration by Chris Shary

100. Amy Jenkins

It wasn’t that long ago (2015, cough, cough) that the cannabis industry was derided or dismissed outright at the Capitol, and pot advocates were seen as hopeless outsiders. No more. With the passage of Proposition 64, the longtime outlaw industry is quickly being transformed into the “Green Rush,” and lobbyist Amy Jenkins

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No. 24: Capitol Weekly’s Top 100

Illustration by Chris Shary

24: Nick Hardeman

The dust has settled with Senate leadership changes, with Sen. Toni Atkins, a San Diego Democrat, taking the top slot to replace Kevin de León, who is running for the U.S. Senate. Nick Hardeman, who worked closely with Atkins when she was Assembly speaker, moved over to the Senate this year as

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Brown: New money needed to boost 911 system

A fire truck, a first responder to emergencies, crosses a Los Angeles intersection. (Photo: Walter Cicchetti, via Shutterstock)

The administration plans to modify an existing tax on phone calls to include a flat fee — estimated initially at 34 cents per line — on cellphones, landlines and other devices capable of contacting 911. More than $175 million is expected to generate from this in the first year, with the possibility of growing to $400 million in later years.

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