Capitol Weekly Podcast: Wayne Johnson

Political consultant Wayne Johnson. (Photo: Tim Foster, Capitol Weekly)

Veteran political consultant Wayne Johnson, who has handled well over 200 campaigns in California, the U.S. and across the world, joins the Podcast this week to chat about politics and technology with Capitol Weekly’s John Howard and Tim Foster. Johnson, who handles mostly GOP candidates, is busy this year: He is working on Republican businessman John Cox’s gubernatorial campaign, which got a boost moments before we recorded the show when former Congressman Doug Ose abruptly exited the race.


Electric vehicles in the fast lane

An electric vehicle gets a battery recharge at the L.A. Auto Show. Photo: Juan Camilo Bernal)

By the time today’s infants are in their early 30s, gasoline-powered cars that aren’t electric hybrids could be a rarity in California. That’s the goal of California policy makers who are doing their best to phase those cars out by 2050 and replace them with zero-emissions vehicles like electric cars, plug-in hybrids and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.


Building sector must transition to clean energy

View of Los Angeles with solar panels in the foreground. (Photo: Zhu Difeng, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: When snowboarders Chloe Kim and Shaun White return home to California after dazzling on the halfpipe to win gold at the Olympic Winter Games, there won’t be much snow to greet them. The snowpack in the Sierra Mountains is 80% below normal, an ominous harbinger of more drought for a state already reeling from record wildfires, and a stark reminder that the most important challenge of all – the race against climate change – remains to be won.


Twitter is Sacramento’s ‘Fourth House’

A Twitter user logs on with her digital tablet. (Photo: Daniel Krason, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: It is a colossal mistake for those who desire to influence state policy to ignore Twitter, brushing it off as a playground for pop stars, professional athletes and the President. As demonstrated in Randle Communications’ inaugural Digital Influencer Report, digital advocacy, and specifically Twitter, remains a growing and potent tool for those who seek to shape outcomes in California’s Capitol.


Laura Friedman: First-term lawmaker in key Capitol role

A dermonstrator at a Sacramento rally against sexual misconduct. (Photo: Tim Foster/Capitol Weekly)

Assemblywoman Laura Friedman, a first-term lawmaker, is among the most prominent figures in the California Capitol working to combat sexual harassment. She’s not only become the Legislature’s de facto point person on sexual misconduct, but also responsible for reshaping the current harassment-reporting process that many say has failed victims.


Tackling California’s opioid crisis

A photo illustration of opioid addiction. (Photo: Kimberly Boyles, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: A key focus of this year’s California legislative session is the nation’s opioid crisis, and rightly so. According to the California Healthcare Foundation, an estimated 2,000 Californians died of an opioid overdose in 2016. The opioid epidemic confronting California and the rest of America is a growing public health crisis from which no state is immune. 


CA120: Chasing the GOP vote

Republican candidates for governor -- Doug Ose, left, John Cox, center, and Travis Allen. (Illustration: Tim Foster)

The Republican side of the governor’s race has become an interesting contest to watch because, if for no other reason, of the way these candidates are trying to differentiate themselves before the June primary election. A debate in San Francisco led moderator John Diaz from the Chronicle to exclaim “This is the first time in San Francisco I have heard an argument among people about who most supports Donald Trump!”


Prevailing wage crucial for construction workers

A high-rise construction site in San Jose. (Photo: PBK-PG, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: It is sadly ironic that portions of the construction industry have been fighting for years to reduce wages on these important but dangerous jobs are now claiming they face a skilled labor shortage. Just last year, California’s housing industry spent millions of dollars lobbying against minimum labor standards in any part of the residential construction sector. 


Inside the Capitol: Should Joint Rule 10.5 be changed?

The state Capitol in Sacramento. (Photo: Kris Wiktor)

The burning question of the day: Should Joint Rule 10.5 be changed? If you, like most normal people, have little interest in the Capitol’s battles, then this question prompts a big yawn. But if you engage in the interminable wars over legislation, then this issue is a very, very big deal. So pay attention, you may be tested on this later.


Capitol Weekly Podcast: Dan Morain

Dan Morain (Photo: Tim Foster)

Veteran political journalist Dan Morain joins us to chat about Steve Poizner, California’s former insurance commissioner who announced this week he wants to get his old job back — only this time by running as an independent, not a Republican.

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