News

Shortage developing in California of educated workers

An interior view of one of the rooms of the Spacecraft Fabrication Facility of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. (Photo: Sundry Photography, via Shutterstock)

California faces an increasing demand for affordable higher education and a need for adequate facilities suited to a rapidly evolving economy. PPIC estimates that by 2030 the supply of college graduates will fall 1.1 million short of workforce demand. All three public systems—UC, CSU, and CCC—are working to bridge that gap.

News

Education: Tony Thurmond’s silver bullet

State Schools Superintendent Tony Thurmond at the Sacramento Press Club in September. (Photo: Rich Pedroncelli/Associated Press)

Abandoned by his father and orphaned at age 6 after the death of his mother to cancer, Tony Thurmond believes he could have easily ended up in prison. Instead, the 50-year-old Richmond resident is the new state superintendent of public education. He is the second African-American in the position after Wilson Riles, who served 1971-83.

Opinion

Now, more than ever, public lands must be protected

Eagle Lake in the Sierra Nevada's Desolation Wilderness west of Lake Tahoe. (Photo: William Cushman, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: While it is no surprise where the Trump administration’s priorities lie when it comes to our public lands during this shutdown, the brazenness of their disregard for our protected public lands in favor of special interests should make it crystal clear what matters to them most.

Analysis

Kamala’s long-shot presidential bid

California Sen. Kamala Harris at a 2017 political rally in Torrance. (Photo: Vince360, via Shutterstock)

ANALYSIS: In declaring her candidacy for the Democratic nomination for president, Kamala Harris joins an increasingly crowded field that includes an array of potential California contenders. Whether she will get the nomination is questionable. They would never admit it, but in the deepest part of their minds, a group of California politicians have to be musing about the increasingly likely possibility that poll-leading Joe Biden is going to run for the presidency.

Recent News

Custody fights: Who gets the pets?

A woman and her pet on an errand in LA. (Photo: oneinchpunch, via Shutterstock)

California judges can now consider what is in the best interests of a pet when deciding animal custody cases in divorce disputes. A new law that went into effect Jan. 1 is intended to elevate pets above other community property like furniture or cars.

Opinion

A blitzkrieg reborn: Weaponizing cyberspace

A photo illustration of an cyber attacker on the internet. (Photo: Alexander Geiger, via Shutterstock

OPINION: Germany never accepted defeat in World War I, and it used the next 22 years to re-imagine the internal-combustion engine into a series of devastating weapons, and then to deploy those weapons in combinations never before seen on the field of battle. At the same time, its leaders undermined domestic democratic institutions to solidify its power. Their motive was simple: revenge. I fear a similar dynamic is at play in 2019.

News

Sacramento Women’s March to go on as scheduled

Demonstrators outside the state Capitol in Sacramento at the 2018 women's march.(Photo: Lorraine_M, via Shutterstock)

Last January, about 36,000 people gathered in Sacramento to march in support of the #MeToo movement. Many women and their allies who marched included those that spoke out and signed an open letter denouncing sexual harassment within the Capitol community. Supporters hope they will have a similar turnout Saturday.

Opinion

Challenges face lobbying, PR in California’s ‘blue wave’

The state Capitol in Sacramento. (Photo: Adonis Villanueva, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: For public affairs companies that work to impact policy on behalf of their clients – and especially those that represent business interests — the post-Blue Wave environment means that the old school, relationship approach will be less effective than proactive policy and district impact programs.

Opinion

Small businesses key to California’s economic health

Two customers order lunch at an artisan bakery in Oakdale. (Photo: James Kirkikis, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: The start of the new year also brings a new governor and a new Legislature, which provides opportunity for Californians to set new goals and expectations of our elected leaders in Sacramento. Small business owners, especially, have much at stake in the halls of the state Capitol, with many new opportunities and challenges ahead in 2019.

News

Trump’s tweeted threats against California coming up empty

Donald Trump speaks to California supporters during a 2015 campaign rally aboard the USS Iowa in San Pedro. (Photo: Joseph Sohm, via Shutterstock)

President Donald Trump threatened—again—to withhold federal dollars from California as the state copes with the aftermath of wildfires. But the president’s action is on shaky legal ground. That’s because there are clear guidelines governing how federal funding is administered and under what circumstances it can be cut off.

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