News

Highway deaths: Red states vs. Blue states

A fire truck races to an emergency in downtown Los Angeles, 2016. (Photo Alexandre Moraes, via Shutterstock)

FairWarning: November’s presidential contest was bizarre in many ways, but there is one peculiarity that pundits haven’t pounced on: The states with the worst rates of traffic deaths in the country went solidly for Donald Trump while Hillary Clinton swept states with the lowest fatality rates. California was 10th from the bottom in its traffic fatality rate — about 8.11 deaths per 100,000 people. The highest was Wyoming, with 24.74 fatalities per 100,000.

Opinion

The CPUC and environmental justice

A natural gas plant near Ventura, Calif. (Photo: Henrik Lehnerer)

OPINION: California is moving faster than expected toward a clean energy future with ambitious greenhouse gas reduction targets and new innovations in renewable energy. However, there is still work to be done to ensure that all Californians can benefit from the cleaner air, local jobs and economic benefits clean energy can bring. State regulatory agencies play a powerful role in making our clean energy future a reality.

Opinion

The pitfalls of overregulation

A power plant in Manhattan Beach, shortly after its 2012 opening. (Photo: Luc Mena)

OPINION: Recognizing the need to reduce the burdens of overregulation to spur our nation’s economy, Congress put on the top of their legislative agenda the REINS Act, which would require the House and Senate to approve any major regulation before it can go into effect. California — no stranger to abundant regulations and the increasing consolidation of power in state agencies promulgating an ever-growing list of major regulations — must also rein in overregulation the way Congress is trying to do to revitalize job creation throughout our state.

Analysis

‘Alternative facts’ — a tale of falsity

(Photo: Cbies, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Writing in The New York Times, John McWhorter, an assistant professor of English at Columbia, tells a tale about the Kuma tribe in Panama. The Kuna chief gives a speech in elevated language, and then an assistant tells the crowd what the chief has just said. We may like to think of ourselves as an advanced civilization compared to a trtibe in Panama, but today’s spokespeople for politicians are doing the same thing. And one of them has just invented “alternative facts.”

News

Capitol Weekly Podcast: Daniel Zingale

Daniel Zingale (Photo: Scott Duncan, Capitol Weekly)

In Part 2 of our back-to-back podcasts on health policy, Capitol Weekly headed over to the California Endowment’s offices on K Street to chat with the Endowment’s VP Daniel Zingale about what a repeal of the Affordable Care Act would mean for California. Zingale also weighs in on other health-related topics including Universal Health Care, how your neighborhood affects your health and EXACTLY how bad soda (“it’s mostly chemicals”) is for you. We conducted this interview on Friday, Jan. 27, 2017.

News

DMV, Judicial Council hit over fees

California drivers in a Los Angeles traffic jam.(Photo: ShutterStock)

A motorist who faced more than $1,600 in fines for a traffic violation is suing the Department of Motor Vehicles and the state Judicial Council in federal court, contending that millions of California drivers had their licenses suspended illegally because they were unable to pay spiraling fees. “Traffic courts in California routinely impose exorbitant penalty assessments, fines and fees on all traffic court cases over and above the statutory fines” required for public safety, the pending suit contends.

News

Capitol Weekly Podcast: Anthony Wright

Anthony Wright, executive director of Health Access California. (Photo: Scott Duncan)

Capitol Weekly’s John Howard and Tim Foster sit down with Anthony Wright of Health Access California to talk about the impact of the repeal of the Affordable Care Act, AKA Obamacare. Is it happening? If so, when? How much will it cost Californians? And, what’s the significance of February 20? All this and more on the latest Capitol Weekly Podcast.

Opinion

Infrastructure: Brown and Trump agree

The Tower Bridge in Sacramanto west of the state Capitol. (Photo: Tupungato, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: “Amen to that, brother,” Governor Jerry Brown exhorted in his state of the state speech in support of President Donald Trump’s call for spending $1 trillion on infrastructure improvements. It was the only sense of cooperation the governor offered to the new president and some of his expected policies.

News

State writing new pot regulations

A marijuana plant growing in Northern California. (Photo: Shutterstock)

California authorities are crafting new rules governing both medical and recreational marijuana, and they hope to present them to the public in March. The move follows voter approval in November of Proposition 64, which legalized recreational pot use. It passed by 2 million votes out of nearly 14 million cast.

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