News

CW Podcast: Return from Russia

Political consultants Ray McNally, left, and Steven Maviglio. (Photo: Tim Foster)

Capitol Weekly’s John Howard and Tim Foster pay a visit to Sacramento political consultants Steven Maviglio and Ray McNally who just got back from Moscow. Their mission: explain American politics to the Russians. Their problem: who could explain THIS crazy election?

Opinion

Transportation plans stymied

A mid-1930s truck on a Kern County highway. (Photo: Joseph Sohm, Shutterstock)

OPINION: They blew it. Fifteen months ago, Governor Brown called the Legislature into special session to find new ways to pay for the state’s aging transportation system.

News

‘Portable’ pensions: Historic changes loom

A photo illustration of pension protection. (Photo: Billion Photos, via Shutterstock)

In a decision that could serve as a national model, Gov. Jerry Brown is considering legislation to allow millions of private-sector employees to steadily build their pensions without interruption — even when they change jobs.

News

A conversation with Planned Parenthood’s Kathy Kneer

Kathy Kneer, president and CEO of California Planned Parenthood. (Photos: Planned Parenthood)

Capitol Weekly Interview: Kathy Kneer is the president and CEO of California Planned Parenthood. CW’s Alex Matthews caught up with Kathy recently for a detailed discussion that included health care, family planning, meeting the needs of low-income Californians and the challenges of the Affordable Care Act.

News

Poll: California poverty a big problem, but what’s the fix?

A tent camp for the homeless in San Francisco. (Photo: Brittany Hosea-Small, KQED)

A majority of Californians believe poverty is a serious problem, but they disagree over what to do about it. That’s according to a survey conducted for our California Counts public radio collaboration. The survey by CALSPEAKS asked hundreds of voters and some nonvoters across California how they feel about a range of economic issues, from home ownership and job security to wage disparity and upward mobility.

News

CA120: On the trail of the provisionals

(Vector illustration: NoDenmand, via Shutterstock)

California’s primary election was filled with administrative glitches. And some of those problems actually may have disenfranchised voters who hoped to vote in a very dramatic presidential primary. Ironically, one of the largest post-election dramas surrounding the June vote in California was how these problems were being resolved.

Opinion

Legislature acts — and we breathe easier

Downtown Los Angeles seen through the smog. (Photo: Justin Dennis, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Millions of Californians suffered from smog and smoke this summer, but help is on the way. Defying the expectations of many observers and the fierce opposition of the oil industry, the Legislature passed a historic climate protection package in August.

News

Ballot measures in the crosshairs

Participants in a panel discussion of Proposition 62 and 66. Attorney Nancy Haydt, right; Michele Hanisee of the L.A. County Deputy District Attorneys Association, center; and Anne Marie Schubert, Sacramento County district attorney. (Photo: Scott Duncan/Capitol Weekly)

It was a wonkish wonderland. Capital Public Radio and Capitol Weekly combined forces Thursday to stage the first “California Votes” series of panel discussions on six of the most controversial ballot measures voters will face on November 8.

News

Pavley’s legacy: premier warrior fighting greenhouse gases

Fran Pavley and former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger at a Capitol news conference in 2009. Photo: Rich Pedroncelli/AP

As a longtime former middle school teacher, Fran Pavley thought she would focus her energies on education when she got elected to the California Legislature 15 years ago.
But Robert Hertzberg, who was then Assembly speaker, gave the Southern California politician some advice. “He said we have several champions on education, we need you to focus on the environment,” Pavley said. She did.

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