Opinion

Deadly force proposal needs work

Police officers deployed at a Los Angeles parade. (Photo: Betto Rodrigues)

OPINION: California’s Assembly Bill 931, which would modify the state legal standard governing police officers’ use of deadly force, is a promising advance on existing law, but the current proposal is deeply flawed. To meaningfully reform police practices and properly regulate the use of deadly force, some significant amendments are necessary.

Opinion

Community college funding: Put students first

The entrance to Pasadena Community College. (Photo: Angel DiBilio, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: A certain (now disgraced) writer-producer-director is credited with saying, “80 percent of success is just showing up.” That would be nice, right? But for many of us, this just doesn’t hold true. Showing up to a job interview doesn’t get us 80 percent of the way to the job. Showing up to college doesn’t get us 80 percent of the way into the class we want.

Opinion

Lead paint ruling hurts homeowners, rewards trial bar

Wooden stairs painted with white lead in a home's entrance porch. (Photo: Artizum, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Home ownership remains the quintessential American dream, despite its burdens and financial hurdles. If you’re a homeowner who’s worked hard to buy the roof over your head, the value of your home may be at risk due to a recent court ruling. A California judge has ruled that homes built before 1981 are a public nuisance because those homes are presumed to contain some lead paint.

Opinion

Human trafficking: Inspiration from the survivors

Photo illustration of a woman held captive, a victim of human trafficking. (Photo: Structuresxx, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: I’m a survivor of human trafficking. When I was 7, I was sold into trafficking by my abuser. A young woman just a few years older than me, who had also been trafficked, helped free me when I was 11 years old. I didn’t see myself as a survivor until I saw other survivors take ownership over what happened to them and transform their healing to action.

Opinion

California’s road to sustainable freight

A freight-laden train makes its way through a city's core. (Photo: Serjio74,. via Shutterstock)

When most of us receive a package at our door from Amazon or another delivery service, we rarely think about the complex system that brought it to us, from manufacturing and packaging to shipping, sorting and last-mile delivery. But California’s massive freight system is key to both our economy and our environmental health.

Opinion

Paint: Time to get the lead out

Two painters in protective suits remove lead paint from an old house. (Photo: Jaime Hooper)

OPINION: Seeing no way to prevail in the courts, the Big Three filed a ballot initiative that would nullify the court judgment holding them responsible for lead paint cleanup in 10 counties, and effectively pardon them by preventing any future suits. Perhaps worst of all, the toxic paint producers’ initiative would force taxpayers to clean up the companies’ own toxic paint mess, draining nearly $4 billion dollars from our state budget.  

Opinion

Wildfires, insurance: Avoid the quick fix

The Canyon Fire 2 approaches Anaheim in October 2017. (Photo: Aarti Kalyani)

OPINION: After a barrage of devastating wildfires raged across our state in recent months, it is time for all Californians to accept a sobering fact: this is the new normal. Several factors — including warmer and drier summers, and decades of fire suppression — have created a California that will be much more susceptible to wildfires in the future.

Opinion

Claims adjusters need training, background checks

A man surveys the charred debris of Glen Ellen home following a 2017 wildfire. (Photo: Rebecca Jane Call, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Recently Capitol Weekly printed an article by David Farber (“Don’t fix unbroken system for claims adjusters,” April 16) asserting that the California Department of Insurance (CDI) was advocating for a bill, SB 1291 by state Sen. Bill Dodd, which would, in Farber’s words, “create a shortage of claims professionals” in the aftermath of last year’s devastating wildfires. Farber couldn’t be more wrong.

Opinion

Prop.1 grants should include groundwater storage

Don Edwards Wildlife Refuge headquarters, South San Francisco Bay, Alviso.(Photo: Sundry Photagraphy)

OPINION: The California Water Commission has the opportunity to create a new paradigm for water storage that delivers more cost-effective storage and an ability to ensure there will be enough water for communities, business and public purposes –keeping our rivers alive with enough water for fish, wildlife and recreation for people. That opportunity is to include groundwater storage in Proposition 1 allocations.

Opinion

Don’t fix unbroken system for claims adjusters

Destruction from last year's Wine Country fires. (Photo: Janos Rautonen, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: The current system allows claims adjusting companies that employ professional adjusters to secure a license covering its employees, which is practical and efficient and meets the needs of California’s consumers. Far from unique, this system has been proven to work in states like Montana and Utah. However, if the department’s bill, SB 1291 is enacted, it would totally upend a perfectly functional system for licensing independent insurance adjusters by disallowing state licensing for companies to cover its professionals

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