Analysis

CA120: Say hello to the California Voter File

Voters and potential voters at a political rally. (Photo: Joseph Sohm, via Shutterstock)

The California Voter File is a massive and constantly changing dataset. At the end of the 2012 election cycle, it grew to over 18 million voters. But with recent purges from county election files, it has dropped down to its current 17 million. As we near a major statewide election, we expect to see an uptick in registration and growth of the overall voter file. The state’s registration is likely — again — to exceed 18 million, and potentially even reach 19 million by November.

Analysis

How California Latinos stop Trump

Photo: GrassrootsLab.com

California will award 172 delegates in the Republican presidential primary, a mother load of support that could guarantee a decisive national role for Golden State GOP voters on June 7. Unlike several other states in the election cycle where the winner takes all delegates, California Republicans designed special rules to empower grassroots activists a few years ago.

Analysis

June primary: California buckles up

A presidential campaign event at the Oxnard train station during an earlier election. (Photo: Joseph Sohm, via Shutterstock)

Brace yourselves, Californians. The violent, vicious and volatile Republican political campaigns that have destroyed civility across parts of the South and Midwest are increasingly likely to cross the Sierra and spread vitriol in the Golden State.

Analysis

CA120: California, here you come

Illustration by Tim Foster, Capitol Weekly.

Yes, this could be happening. California, despite holding its primary presidential election in June and being a (somewhat) proportional state, could matter in the Democratic nomination process. And it will almost certainly provide the final big set of Republican delegates that could give Donald Trump the 1,237 he needs for the nomination — or deny him and ensure a contested GOP convention.

Analysis

CA120: Hey, why avoid the ballot photo op?

Former California Gov. Ronald Reagan and wife Nancy voting in the 1980 presidential general election. (Photo: Associated Press)

There are few more iconic images in American politics than the candidate and spouse exiting the polling booth on Election Day. The sun is shining, the vibrant political family is in full bloom and democracy is in the air. But, in modern elections, this is changing

Analysis

Capitol Weekly podcast

Jim Heerwagen, left, and Shane McCloud, of Voters Right to Know. (Photo: Tim Foster, Capitol Weekly)

Voters Right to Know, a reform group seeking political transparency, has dropped a bid to qualify a constitutional amendment guaranteeing public access to campaign finance information. Instead, the group is backing a new bill, SB 1349 by Sen. Bob Hertzberg, D-Van Nuys, that would improve Californians’ access to campaign data. Jim Heerwagen, a leader of the group, and campaign manager Shane McLoud stopped by Capitol Weekly’s office to talk about the new strategy.

Analysis

CA120: In political polling, art and science join hands

The attitudes of voters. Illustration by Niroworld, via Shutterstock.

Friday night, my wife Jodi got home after a long week. Trying to decide what we should do, she flipped through some channels, looking at the networks, a couple sports channels, a few news channels, HBO and Showtime, and then finally announced “I don’t think there’s anything good on TV, let’s go see a movie.”

Analysis

Capitol Weekly podcast

Rough&Tumble's Jack Kavanagh, right, stops by the Capitol Weekly podcast in our new, high-tech audio booth. (Photo: Tim Foster)

Rough &Tumble’s Jack Kavanagh stops by the lavish offices of Capitol Weekly for a chat with John Howard and Tim Foster about journalism, the internet, and why you won’t find The Economist on R&T.

Analysis

Capitol Weekly podcast

Cardboard cutouts at the state Democratic Convention. (Photo: Capitol Weekly)

Capitol Weekly’s John Howard and Tim Foster chat about California politics, including the state Democratic Party’s convention, forgotten assets, the possible end of Daylight Savings Time and more.

Analysis

CA120: Voter registration: GOP death rattle or a missed opportunity for Dems?

Stock vector illustration, via Shutterstock.

With the release of official voter registration numbers this week, the focus has been on the continued decline in Republican registration and growth in Independent voters. The stories, for the most part, treat these two factors as directly related, like two ends of a see-saw. As Republicans lose ground, independents grow and common wisdom within California’s political class jumps to the causal link. However, looking closer at the data, there are two significant factors that should temper this quick rush to judgement.

Support for Capitol Weekly is Provided by: