Affordable housing crisis grips California

A view towards Palo Alto, Stanford and the cities of south San Francisco Bay, where housing is at a premium.(Photo: Sundry Photography)

California lawmakers are in midst of trying to solve a housing crisis that has spread throughout the state. The state’s Department of Housing and Community Development — an agency that works to expand access to affordable housing — says California has built an average of 80,000 homes a year for the past decade, which is less than half of the 180,000 new homes needed to keep up with the predicted population growth through 2025.

Continue Reading »
News

Stem cell agency faces leadership challenge

Human embryonic stem cells. (Photo: California Institute for Regenerative Medicine)

California’s 12-year-old stem cell research effort is expected to give away tens of millions of dollars in public this week, but its most important matters — issues that deal with its survival and future — likely will be discussed behind closed doors at a meeting Thursday of its governing board. On the table is the leadership of the $3 billion organization, which is scheduled to run out of cash in just three years.

News

Brown dismantles ‘powerful but obscure’ Board of Equalization

Board of Equalization headquarters in Sacramento. (Photo: BOE)

Ask the average Californian what the state Board of Equalization (BOE) does and you’re likely to get a blank look. That may not matter anymore. Much of what the 138-year-old agency does — which includes collecting some $60 billion in taxes — will be taken away from it amid a spate of recent reports about potential corruption and possible criminality.

Opinion

After 30 years, personal allowance in nursing homes still $35

Nursing home patients at their facility. Photo: ChameleonsEye, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: In 1965 Congress passed and the president signed into law Medicaid. At that time, they decided on how much a nursing home resident should be able to keep from his or her income toward meeting personal needs. They decided that $30 per month would be a fair allowance. The Personal Needs Allowance has remained the same at $35.00 since the 1980s.

News

Capitol Weekly podcast: Rob Lapsley

Rob Lapsley, president and CEO of the California Business Roundtable. (Photo: Tim Foster)

Rob Lapsley, the president and CEO of the California Business Roundtable, joins Capitol Weekly’s John Howard and Tim Foster to discuss one of the biggest policy issues of the year — the extension of California’s cap-and-trade auction program.

News

Capitol Weekly podcast: Paul Mitchell on census impacts

Illustration by CBProject, via Shutterstock

The 2020 count by the U.S. Census could have a big impact on California’s political districts. The numbers mean everything.

For example, will California lose a Congressional seat if the count comes in lower than expected? Some political observers say yes. If we lose a seat, will it be at the expense of an African American incumbent? Will California gain a congressional seat, giving the state 54th seat in the House?

If so, where will it be? In the Inland Empire? Let’s find out. Let’s ask Paul Mitchell.

News

CA120: California’s shifting populations

A San Francisco street scene. (Photo: Oneinchpunch, via Shutterstock)

Part 3: As California grows, the shifts of population within the state can have a dramatic impact on the drawing of future political boundaries. These shifts can be broken into two different types of population counts: The absolute population counts as defined by the 2020 U.S. Census, and the citizen voting age populations, or CVAP.

Opinion

Smart cities will move right along with 5G

An illustration of the urban connectivity of a 5G-based wireless system. (Image: Supparsom, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Smart cities will soon take a major leap forward — thanks to a groundbreaking technology, 5G, or the 5th generation wireless network. 5G is anticipated to be 100 times faster than the current 4G network, which many of our devices utilize today, and 5G will dramatically reduce the time it takes to share information.

Analysis

CA120: The redistricting commission, lines and political pressure

The House of Representatives, which may wind up with new members following the 2020 redistricting. (Photo: House of Representatives)

ANALYSIS: California’s independent Citizens Redistricting Commission was established by two ballot measures in 2008 and 2010, following several unsuccessful pushes by Republicans who saw themselves as perpetually sidelined when it came to drawing the state’s political boundaries. Success came when they were joined by a coalition of non-partisan groups and deep-pocket Silicon Valley funders, who saw the commission as a part of overall reforms, like the creation of an open primary.

Recent Posts
More Recent Posts »
Support for Capitol Weekly is Provided by: