Capitol Weekly Podcast: Jay Lund

Jay Lund, director of the Center for Watershed Sciences at UC Davis.

The Capitol Weekly Podcast crew crosses the Yolo Causeway to sit down with UC Davis Professor Jay Lund, director of the Center for Watershed Sciences. One of the most respected voices in California water, Lund chats about the evolution of the Central Valley’s water storage and delivery systems. He also takes note of our water infrastructure — including what to watch for as storms and snowmelt pummel the the state.

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Opinion

On environment, some lessons for Brown

A hazy day in the Los Angeles Basin, New Year's Day, 2015. (Photo:Trekandshoot, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: Gov. Jerry Brown has called Donald Trump’s election the proverbial “heart attack” to get California off of the equivalent of cigarettes — climate-destroying fossil fuels. But for Brown to be the foil to Trump’s anti-environmental policies, it’s going to take a lot more than launching California’s own climate-tracking satellite.

News

Ask Emily: Health and taxes

Tax form image via California Healthline

K.A. Curtis gave up her career in the nonprofit world in 2008 to care for her ailing parents in Fresno, which also meant giving up her income. She wasn’t able to afford health insurance as a result, and for each tax year since 2014, Curtis has applied for – and received – an exemption from Obamacare’s coverage requirement and the related tax penalty, she says

News

State senator ordered off floor

State Sen. Janet Nguyen, R-Garden Grove. (Photo: Screen capture, California Channel)

In a remarkable confrontation, a Republican state senator of Vietnamese descent was hustled off the Senate floor Thursday, after majority Democrats said she was out of order for trying to make disparaging comments about the late political activist Tom Hayden.

News

Bar exam failure rates draw scrutiny

A student crams for an exam. (Photo: Antonio Diaz)

California’s law-school students are failing the daunting State Bar exam in surprising numbers — and experts are trying to figure out why. “It’s difficult to understand why the pass rate in California is so low,” said Barry Currier, the managing director of the American Bar Association’s legal education and admissions unit.

News

Capitol Weekly Podcast: Chris Austin

Chris Austin, publisher of Maven's Notebook. (Photo: Scott Duncan, Capitol Weekly

As floods ravage San Jose and the spillway of the Oroville Dam continues to erode, we’re joined by California’s essential water policy blogger, Chris Austin of Maven’s Notebook. We chatted about water storage, conveyance, subsidence, aquifers, the Yolo Causeway and, of course, the Twin Tunnels project. And we find out why one of the state’s most closely read water blogs has such an odd name.

News

A California tale: The one-room schoolhouse

A one-room schoolhouse in Comptche, Mendocino County, which serves 14 students. (Photo: California Teachers Association)

The 112-year-old schoolhouse with the old-fashioned bell looks like it should be a historical museum. But it’s a working K-8 public school with only 10 students. Washington School, about 20 miles east of Nevada City in the Sierra foothills, is one of a handful of one-room schools scattered scattered across rural California.

Opinion

Wanted: An early warning system for local governments

Pedestrians crossing Hollywood Boulevard in Los Angeles. (Photo: Sean Pavone, Shutterstock)

OPINION: Back in 2012, then Treasurer Bill Lockyer called for an early warning system that would give state officials time to proactively address local government fiscal emergencies before they wound up in bankruptcy court. We are now five years closer to the next recession and its attendant set of local government financial crises, but the state has made little progress toward implementing Lockyer’s proposed system.

News

CA120: The lowdown on California’s election

An illustration of California's flag. (Lukasz Stefanski, Shutterstock)

Immediately after the 2016 there were a number of people and organizations that made quick analyses of the electorate, and what happened. Here in California, we appeared to be bucking a national trend: While the Republican ticket over performed in key swing states on the East Coast and upper mid-west, California saw Democrats regain legislative super-majorities in both houses, hold swing congressional seats and make Republicans appear more vulnerable than they have in many years.

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