Senate race: Delving into DiFi

California Sen. Dianne Feinstein during a Senate confirmation hearing for John Roberts as chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. (Photo: Rob Crandall, via Shutterstock)

Dianne Feinstein’s long political life has been marked by gunfire, victories, toughness and tragedy. The smart money says it’s not over yet. Dianne Feinstein, now 84 and the oldest member of the U. S. Senate, has announced she will run for re-election in 2018, seeking her fifth full term.

Continue Reading »
News

Senate race: De León in steep uphill fight

Kevin de León at the Hollywood Walk of Fame earlier this year. (Photo: Featureflash Photography)

Our recent Sextant Strategies & Research/Capitol Weekly poll of 1,554 likely voters shows just how significant a challenge Kevin de León faces in 2018. Nearly half the electorate has never heard of him, and of those who have, his favorability-versus-unfavorability ratings are about even.  A hypothetical, Feinstein-De León matchup for both the primary and general elections shows Feinstein with better than a 2-to-1 advantage.

News

California gun laws and the Las Vegas shooting

People gather in Las Vegas to mourn the victims of the Oct. 1 mass shooting. (Photo: Pulsipher Photography, Shutterstock)

With the toughest gun laws in the nation, California has a few regulations on the books that potentially could have lessened the carnage in the Las Vegas shooting if those laws had been enacted in Nevada. California outlaws bump stocks and large-capacity magazines, both of which shooter Stephen Paddock used to kill 58 people and wound more than 500 Oct. 1 at a country music festival on the Las Vegas strip.

News

CA120: California’s 2016 Hillary vote

Hillary Clinton at a January 2016 rally in San Gabriel. (Photo: Joseph Sohm)

Throughout the 2016 election cycle, Capitol Weekly conducted several polls of California voters. Two surveys — one during the primary election and the other during the general — targeted voters immediately after they mailed in their ballots. More than 80,000 people responded to the surveys.

News

Capitol community women sign letter on sexual harassment

An image of a man touching the knee of a female colleague at work. (Photo: Shutterstock)

In the wake of the sexual harassment allegations against Hollywood movie producer Harvey Weinstein, scores of lobbyists, lawmakers and staff members signed an open letter detailing examples of sexual harassment in the political community.

Opinion

Fixing Obamacare: It can be done

People in support of the Affordable Care Act rally in Washington, D.C. (Photo: Rena Schild)

OPINION: Democrats and Republicans have found ways in the past to bridge the partisan divide on major health policy issues such as insurance for low-income children, the expansion of Medicare to include drugs, and changing the way Medicare pays for health care services that emphasize value. There’s no reason we can’t do the same to fix the Affordable Care Act, stabilize the marketplace and improve affordability and choice.

News

Oral history: Lobbyist George Steffes

Sacramento lobbyist George Steffes.

When Ronald Reagan was elected governor of California in 1966, George Steffes joined his administration as legislative secretary and director of policy, a job he held until 1972. Steffes then helped form the first multi-partner lobbying firm in Sacramento. He is the senior partner of Capitol Partners.

Analysis

‘New Democrats’ flexing muscle

A Democratic gathering listens to presidential contender Bernie Sanders at a March 2016 rally at the Wiltem Theater in Los Angeles. (Photo: Joseph Sohm)

ANALYSIS: Moderate Democrats are nothing new — they have been around for decades. In the 1980’s a group of moderate Democrats called the “Gang of Five” unsuccessfully tried to unseat Speaker Willie Brown. Today, they are more organized and go by the name, “New Democrats.” Generally, a New Democrat is one who, like Republicans, is business-friendly on some key issues, such as taxes and regulation, and skeptical of some environmental controls that curtail economic growth.

News

Letter to the Editor

Since Congress failed to take Obamacare away from 20 million people, the current President issued an executive order allowing young, healthy people to opt out and buy cheaper health insurance.  This benefits them with cheaper payments, but as they might learn the hard way, you get what you pay for. 

Recent Posts
More Recent Posts »
Support for Capitol Weekly is Provided by: