Clock running out on ending daylight savings*

The clock tower at the San Francisco Ferry Building. (Photo: jejim, via Shutterstock)

California voters likely won’t get a chance after all to decide whether to end daylight savings time. Assemblymember Kansen Chu, D-San Jose, has been pushing to end the annual clock adjustment in response to requests from constituents. He has heard complaints from parents of young children who have trouble putting their kids to bed as well as seniors who are thrown off schedule for a week or more when the time changes. Chu added that companies out of state may find it easier to do business with California if the state keeps on the same time year round.

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Analysis

PolitiFact: Kamala Harris and veterans’ suicides

PolitiFact's Truth-o-Meter

In her campaign for U.S. Senate, California Attorney General Kamala Harris has pledged to “clean up” the scandals and reduce wait times at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The issue, Harris has said, is a matter of life and death.

News

Who decides on greenhouse gases: Voters or lawmakers?

A smog-tinged view in black and white of Century City, Beverly Hills and West Los Angeles. (Photo: Trekandshoot, via Shutterstock)

It’s a familiar fight in the Capitol: Oil companies and their allies say jobs and Californians’ ability to get from place to place at reasonable cost are at stake, which can have a dramatic impact on lower income workers. Environmentalist say the future of the planet is what it’s all about, starting in California. Ultimately, the issue may be decided by millions of voters — not Sacramento lawmakers.

Opinion

Help elephants, ditch the ‘bullhook’

An elephant at a Botswana waterhole. (Photo: Mike Dexter, via Shutterstock)

OPINION:At a time when the news is filled with political campaigns accusing each other of exhibiting divisive behavior and tactics, there is one piece of legislation on Gov. Brown’s desk that is actually bringing organizations together. Senate Bill 1062, by Senator Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) asks California to follow the lead of the cities of Los Angeles and Oakland by banning the use of a sharp device designed to inflict pain for the purpose of training or controlling the behavior of elephants.

Opinion

A solid level of nursing home staffing

A patient gets help walking at a nursing home. (Photo: Photographee.eu, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: If there were Olympic medals for the delivery of quality care in the state’s nursing homes, California would have just scored gold, silver and bronze in seven separate categories. That’s how the federal government ranks the care that is currently delivered – 24 hours a day – to 350,000 residents in skilled nursing facilities in California.

News

Electric car bill gets unplugged

AN electric car takes juice at the L.A. Auto Show. (Photo: Juan Camilo Barnal)

A hasty attempt to boost electric vehicle sales in California – an idea the governor likes – died in the final days of the legislative session amid intense lobbying and fast-approaching deadlines.

News

Tom Steyer, a political force, ponders his options

Environmental activist Tom Steyer at a conference of the Center for American Progress. (Photo: File/Associated Press)

While media reports keep predicting that billionaire Tom Steyer will run for California governor in 2018, Steyer says he has not made a decision yet. There are a lot of factors to consider first, including the coming election, said the 59-year-old former hedge fund manager. “I’m going to keep working on the issues. I’m passionate about it,” he said. “I don’t know the best format to do that yet.”

Opinion

Helping seniors keep a roof over their heads

An elderly couple in front of their home. (Photo: Andy Dean, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: By 2030, California’s over-65 population is expected to be 87 percent higher than it was in 2012 – an increase of more than four million people. According to a 2014 AARP survey, nearly 90 percent of senior households say they would like to stay in their current residences and communities for as long as possible.

Opinion

A voice from the past for 2016

Hunger marchers descend on Washington, D.C., January 1931. (Photo: Everett Historical, via Shutterstock)

OPINION: For those who think the issues at hand are unique to the current domestic dis-tranquility or represent new challenges for inmates of the governing class, gander this: “This is becoming the richest and the poorest country in the world.”

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